Research

Age 60 or over and living with HIV? Have your say!

published: February, 20, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Aging, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Events, Women, Upcoming Events, Research, Health, Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors

Championing Healthy Public Policy for Older Adults Living with HIV in Canada.

Age 60 or over and living with HIV? Have your say!

Please consider joining Realize for one of three upcoming online consultations on Championing Healthy Public Policy for Older Adults Living with HIV in Canada.  These online consultations are open to people living with HIV, service providers, health professionals, researchers, policy makers and others with a shared interest in these issues. Please consider joining Realize for one of three upcoming online consultations on Championing Healthy Public Policy for Older Adults Living with

Will de-simplification of HIV treatment become common in high-income countries?

published: February, 14, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on a study exploring de-simplification as a cost-cutting measure.

Will de-simplification of HIV treatment become common in high-income countries?

- As more people start HIV treatment, researchers are exploring ways to cut costs - Single tablets can be replaced by a few pills comprising cheaper generic drugs - Alberta clinic projects $4.3 million saved by “de-simplifying” one treatment regimen Initiating and staying on HIV treatment (ART) results in most people having very low levels of HIV in their blood. Such low levels are commonly called undetectable and result in improved measures of health and projections of near-normal life

High prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive patients in the US with 'missed opportunities' for its diagnosis and control

published: February, 14, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Mental Health, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Media, Guest Authors

“We found that about 1 in 8 patients has undiagnosed and untreated hypertension,” write the researchers. From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

High prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive patients in the US with 'missed opportunities' for its diagnosis and control

  There is a high prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive patients in the United States and many of these individuals are not receiving hypertensive therapy, investigators report in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Overall, 42% of patients were classified as hypertensive and 13% of these patients were undiagnosed with a further 26% with uncontrolled high blood pressure despite therapy. “We found that about 1 in 8 patients has undiagnosed and untreated hypertension,” write the researc

Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longer

published: February, 12, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Alternative Therapies, Aging, Social Media, Mental Health, Research, Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longer

A chemical found in marijuana, known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, has been found to potentially slow the process in which mental decline can occur in up to 50 percent of HIV patients, says a new Michigan State University study. “It’s believed that cognitive function decreases in many of those with HIV partly due to chronic inflammation that occurs in the brain,” said Norbert Kaminski, lead author of the study, now published in the journal AIDS. “This happens because the immune sys

Generic drugs for HIV treatment may save money, but barriers to prescription make savings elusive

published: February, 08, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

Scepticism among healthcare providers, patients and pharmacists about the safety and efficacy of generic medications is an important barrier. From AIDSmap, Keith Alcorn reports.

Generic drugs for HIV treatment may save money, but barriers to prescription make savings elusive

The potential savings from prescribing generic antiretrovirals predicted by economic models may be overstated and numerous barriers need to be overcome to bring down the cost of HIV treatment in higher-income countries, according to the findings of several recently-published analyses. Switching to cheaper generic versions of some antiretrovirals has been proposed as a means of freeing up money to treat more people with HIV in the United States and other higher-income countries where generics

Indigenizing research: the Wise Practices conference

published: February, 07, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Media, Opinion Pieces

From CATIE Blog, Laurie Edmiston: "...while CAAN and the AHA Centre are trying to conduct community research while honouring Indigenous people’s processes, some of us are still trying to impose our own standards and measures on Indigenous communities."

Indigenizing research: the Wise Practices conference

This past year the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN) held its annual gathering, on the theme of “transforming wholistic approaches to Indigenous health.” It’s a gathering of First Nations, Métis and Inuit people, combining a business meeting, a gathering of Aboriginal people with HIV/AIDS, and the ‘Wise Practices’ research conference. But more importantly, it is a gathering of colleagues who have become friends, clients who have become peers, people with HIV who have become

Disruptions in PrEP adherence provide insights into intimate partner violence

published: February, 06, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Research, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

Study finds strong links between PrEP disruptions and intimate partner violence in Kenya and Uganda. Combined interventions could be key to improving adherence and linking victims to support services. From Avert.org, Francesca Harrington-Edmans reports.

Disruptions in PrEP adherence provide insights into intimate partner violence

Photo credit: istock/znm People who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) are more likely to miss doses of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), in Kenya and Uganda, according to new findings published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (JAIDS).                                                             The study, which recruited participants from four sites across Uganda and Kenya where PrEP was being offered

Taking multiple Rx drugs raises risks for aging adults with and without HIV

published: February, 02, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors, Media

From Yale News, Ziba Kashef reports on a Yale-led study examining the effects of polypharmacy on people living with or without HIV.

Taking multiple Rx drugs raises risks for aging adults with and without HIV

(© stock.adobe.com) Taking five or more prescription medications increases the risk of hospitalization and death in older adults infected with HIV and comparable adults without HIV. The findings of this Yale-led study highlight the potential risks of prescribing additional drugs to patients with multiple medical conditions. The research was published online in the journal AIDS. The use of multiple medications is known as polypharmacy, a common concern due to clearly established increased

4 out of 5 gay, bi and men who have sex with men are aware of HIV prevention drug, PrEP

published: February, 01, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Research, Sexual Health, Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

Indigenous, Latino, bisexual and single men less likely to be aware of newly publicly-funded HIV prevention medication

4 out of 5 gay, bi and men who have sex with men are aware of HIV prevention drug, PrEP

(Vancouver, January 31, 2018) A new study shows most of gay, bi, men who have sex with men (MSM) and other MSM, are aware of PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) - an HIV prevention drug recently made available at no charge to British Columbians at risk of HIV - according to the Momentum Health Study at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. “Gay, bisexual, MSM and other MSM in Canada accounted for 56.8% of all new cases of HIV in Canada,” says research scientist, Nathan Lachowsky. “Incre

What will be the impact of PrEP in Ontario?

published: January, 30, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

The breadth of data being collected is intended to help answer the wide range of questions about what “real-world” PrEP use looks like in the province. Jack Mohr of the Ontario PrEP Cohort Study has this report.

What will be the impact of PrEP in Ontario?

After years spent waiting, more widespread access to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Ontario finally seems to be taking shape. Health Canada approval for generic forms of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (the drug combination used for PrEP) has drastically decreased out of pocket costs for PrEP.  This development, along with concerted lobbying from HIV activists, also led to the addition of PrEP to the Ontario Drug Benefit formulary in September 2017. While these changes don’t

Study links gut-homing protein levels with HIV infection risk, disease progression

published: January, 30, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, Research, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

From the National Institutes of Health: NIH clinical trial is testing antibody against the protein in people with HIV.

Study links gut-homing protein levels with HIV infection risk, disease progression

For the first time, scientists have shown a relationship between the proportion of key immune cells that display high levels of a gut-homing protein called alpha-4 beta-7 at the time of HIV infection and health outcomes. Previous research illustrated this relationship in monkeys infected with a simian form of HIV. The new study found that women who had more CD4+ T cells displaying high levels of alpha-4 beta-7 on their surface were more likely to become infected with HIV, and the virus damage

Inclusion and respect – appreciating the role people living with HIV have with our research partners

published: January, 26, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Activism, Current Affairs, Research, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

Please sign this petition calling for GIPA to be acknowledged in HIV research findings

Inclusion and respect – appreciating the role people living with HIV have with our research partners

The partnerships forged between people living with HIV and researchers have been an essential foundation upon which the response to the HIV epidemic has grown and the time has come to reaffirm and recommit to principles of inclusion and respect in the conduct of presenting research findings that impacts on our lives. The early years of the HIV epidemic ushered in a radically different approach to traditional medical and clinical research. Academics and activists held a shared understanding th

French study confirms the safety and effectiveness of varenicline for HIV-positive smokers

published: January, 25, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, Health, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, International , Smoking Cessation , Media

Varenicline (combined with counselling) can clearly help some HIV-positive people to quit smoking. From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports.

French study confirms the safety and effectiveness of varenicline for HIV-positive smokers

- People living with HIV are known to be at increased risk for smoking-related illnesses. - Researchers find varenicline safe and effective at helping people with HIV quit smoking. - Cessation counsellors who are infectious disease specialists have higher quit rates. The widespread use of potent HIV treatment (ART) has led to improved measures of health and near-normal life expectancy for many people with HIV in Canada and other high-income countries. However, studies have found that ART us

Faster action on adherence is needed after viral load becomes detectable, researchers warn global treatment programmes

published: January, 24, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Newly Diagnosed, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

“Our results show that any detectable viral load between 51 and 999 copies per ml leads to poorer treatment outcomes than successful virological suppression of less than 50 copies per ml,” write the investigators. From AIDSmap, Keith Alcorn reports.

Faster action on adherence is needed after viral load becomes detectable, researchers warn global treatment programmes

Low-level HIV viral load, above the limit of detection, is an important warning signal for future treatment failure and World Health Organization guidelines on spotting treatment failure need to be revised to encourage greater vigilance and swifter action by healthcare providers in lower- and middle-income settings, investigators report in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The study, carried out by Annemarie Wensing and colleagues at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and University

PrEP’s social impact on the lives of some gay men in Toronto

published: January, 23, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Dating, As Prevention , Gay Men, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Research, Sexual Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Lifestyle, Treatment, Living with HIV

Researchers in Toronto conducted a PrEP demonstration project to assess its acceptability, use and effectiveness. From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports.

PrEP’s social impact on the lives of some gay men in Toronto

- Researchers interviewed early adopters of PrEP in Toronto about their experience. - Participants reported that their use of PrEP left them feeling “proud” and “liberated.” - Stigma and judgment related to PrEP also led some participants to conceal their use of it. PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) involves taking two anti-HIV medicines in one pill, usually daily, to reduce the chance of getting HIV. PrEP is meant to be used in combination with other HIV prevention approaches, such a

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