Articles tagged with: social determinants of health

Hepatitis C: A silent killer and story that deserves more attention

published: July, 28, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, Hep B and C, CATIE, General Health, Health, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

From CATIE on the occasion of World Hepatitis Day (July 28), this report on the current state of the fight against Hepatitis C in Canada.

Hepatitis C: A silent killer and story that deserves more attention

Hepatitis C is a silent killer (people can have it for decades without any symptoms) and a story that is not commonly known in Canada. Yet this virus affects many people, highlights inequities in our health and social systems and is part of an important Canadian story. Canada has a history of being on the forefront of addressing hepatitis C, starting with Dr. Michael Houghton, an internationally recognized microbiologist at the University of Alberta, who was the first to co-discover hepatitis

A Canada-led international Indigenous initiative towards global HIV, TB and Hep C targets

published: July, 27, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Social Media, Conferences, Activism, Current Affairs, Features and Interviews, International , Legal, Living with HIV, Media, Population Specific , Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver in conversation with Ken Clement, CEO of the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN)

A Canada-led international Indigenous initiative towards global HIV, TB and Hep C targets

At AIDS2016, in Durban, South Africa, Canadian Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott made a commitment to strengthen the consultative process with Canada’s marginalized indigenous communities. As a result of that promise, on July 10-12 of this year the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN) brought together indigenous leaders and stakeholders from 14 countries to to share promising practices that highlight progress towards achieving global HIV, TB, and hepatitis C targets in Indigenous com

Why are so many young women still dying of HIV/AIDS?

published: July, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Kanan Shah and Dr. Kristina Talbert-Slagle of Yale University present research on the barriers to testing, treatment, regimen adherence and health experienced by women in disparate world settings

Why are so many young women still dying of HIV/AIDS?

Sophia is a 24-year-old mother living in Texas. Like many low-income women in Texas, Sophia receives general medical care at a family planning site, where she was diagnosed with HIVi. Placed on antiretroviral therapy (ART) Sophia, like one in five Texans, is uninsuredii making her treatment virtually unaffordable. Texas is one of nearly 20 states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Actiii, leaving millions without affordable health insurance. Texas also has

‘A near normal lifespan for people with HIV?’ For whom is this true - and who misses out?

published: May, 15, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Social Media, Aging, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Health, International , Smoking Cessation , Treatment, Megan DePutter, Opinion Pieces

Megan DePutter: "We can’t ignore these vulnerabilities that can put individuals more at risk both for acquiring HIV, getting diagnosed late, or struggling to adhere to the medication."

‘A near normal lifespan for people with HIV?’ For whom is this true - and who misses out?

Yesterday, the Lancet published a study titled ‘Survival of HIV-positive patients starting antiretroviral therapy between 1996 and 2013: a collaborative analysis of cohort studies’. This study found that ‘even in the late ART era, survival during the first three years of ART continues to improve.’ In fact, the authors found that ‘between 1996 and 2010, life expectancy in 20-year-old patients starting ART increased by about nine years in women and ten years in men.’ The authors con

Views from the front lines: PrEP in Canada

published: March, 01, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Treatment, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

CATIE spoke to three service providers about PrEP and finds very different conditions in different regions, but a common need for PrEP access.

Views from the front lines: PrEP in Canada

We spoke to three service providers to find their views and insights on how they talk to their clients about PrEP: Holly Taylor, Women's HIV/AIDS Community Development Coordinator, Regional HIV/AIDS Connection, London, Ontario Brook Biggin, Community Education Facilitator, HIV Edmonton; Founder, Edmonton Men’s Health Collective, Edmonton, Alberta Jessica Quijano, Travailleuse de rue, RÉZO, Montreal, Quebec Holly Taylor Are the communities or clients that you work with a

Why a course on sexual health and dementia

published: January, 31, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Aging, Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Events, Sexual Health, International , Treatment, Megan DePutter, Sex and Sexuality

Megan DePutter: "Well-intended concerns about consent and capacity may lead to withholding information or efforts to restrict or manage sexual behaviour in ways that may be inappropriate."

Why a course on sexual health and dementia

Terrence Higgins Trust has partnered with Alzheimer Scotland to offer a course on Sexual Health and Dementia (for course details see bottom of post) in our new Learning Centre. Sexual health needs might not be the first thing you think of when it comes to supporting people with dementia. But sexual health is important for everyone. Here are a few reasons why we at Terrence Higgins Trust Scotland and Alzheimer Scotland felt it was important to create a course on Sexual Health and Dementia. 1.

Why is tackling stigma so difficult?

published: July, 08, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Youth, Newly Diagnosed, Mental Health, Women, International , Legal, Media, Opinion Pieces, Sex and Sexuality , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From the U. K., the National Aids Trust details the multiple challenges we face in ending stigma.

Why is tackling stigma so difficult?

This article previously appeared on the National AIDS Trust website here. For many in HIV advocacy addressing stigma is the Holy Grail. Many, if not all, of the factors that drive the HIV epidemic are embroiled with stigma.  The impact it has on the lives of people living with HIV is well documented.  In a recent survey of over half of people living with HIV reported feelings of shame, guilt, low self-esteem and self-blame; one in five had experienced verbal harassment or threats.1 Stigma

Are people who use drugs listened to?

published: June, 07, 2016 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // General Health, Mental Health, Research, Health, Guest Authors

Bob Leahy talks to the Canadian AIDS Society’s Lynne Belle-Isle whose research work includes examining the inclusion of people who use drugs in decision making processes

Are people who use drugs listened to?

Bob Leahy: Thanks for talking to PostiveLite.com Lynne. Now tell me, the title of the research you presented at CAHR was what? Lynne Belle-Isle: What I presented was a summary of my research with the Centre for Addiction Research, B.C. It was tilted “From One Ally to Another: Practical Guidelines to Better Include People who Use Drugs at your Decision-making Table.” Why did you think this would be a valuable topic to explore? It started back with my work at the Canadian AIDS Society. I

Dumbing down treatment decisions, part two

published: March, 01, 2016 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // As Prevention , Mental Health, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy say there are wrong decisions made - both regarding treatment and prevention - all the time. But how do we help our most vulnerable who face barriers to good decision-making avoid them?

Dumbing down treatment decisions, part two

Sometimes we hear “there are no bad answers, no bad decisions”. It’s a warm and fuzzy concept that fits with the non-judgmental services we as a community provide. Trouble is it's wrong. Undeniably bad decisions are being made all the time.  (You likely made one last time you ate.) On the treatment front, for example, Charlie Sheen made a bad decision. And then there is this from an earnest HIVer on Facebook “When to start treatment? It's best to wait until there is a patch, a spray

TowelTalk: Inside Toronto’s Bathhouses

published: June, 05, 2012 Written by // John McCullagh - Publisher emeritus Categories // Gay Men, Mental Health, Features and Interviews, Sexual Health, Health, Population Specific , Sex and Sexuality , John McCullagh

John McCullagh talks with Marco Posadas about TowelTalk, a bathhouse counselling program that seeks to address the psychosocial issues that have an impact on HIV risk for gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men.

TowelTalk: Inside Toronto’s Bathhouses

For many years, outreach workers and volunteers from community-based organizations have worked with bathhouses to provide HIV and STI awareness, prevention and education services to bathhouse patrons. ACT, a Toronto ASO, has augmented these sexual health promotion activities through TowelTalk. This innovative program offers brief, walk-in counselling sessions in the bathhouse by professionally trained counsellors. The objective is to address the psychosocial issues that can have an i

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