Articles tagged with: sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

U.S. simulation explores the intersection of PrEP and some sexually transmitted infections

published: October, 10, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Research, Sexual Health, Health, Treatment, Lifestyle, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

"The results of the researchers’ simulations show that PrEP should be considered as a package of interventions, of which STI screening and treatment are an important part. From Catie, Sean R. Hosein reports.

U.S. simulation explores the intersection of PrEP and some sexually transmitted infections

The use of medicines to prevent a person from becoming infected with HIV is called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PrEP consists of two anti-HIV drugs—tenofovir DF and FTC—in one pill. In clinical trials with gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM), PrEP has been highly effective in preventing the spread of HIV. According to a team of U.S. researchers who analysed data from several clinical trials, the consistent use of PrEP can reduce the risk of HIV infection “by more

U=U

published: July, 20, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Current Affairs, General Health, Mental Health, Women, Treatment, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

From CATIE's Positive Side: It means different things to different people but the science is clear and it's reason to celebrate.

U=U

The evidence is in: If you are HIV+, take treatment and maintain an undetectable viral load, you can have sex knowing that you won’t pass HIV to your sex partner. In short, when HIV is undetectable, it’s untransmittable. How can I make this work for me? You can make this HIV prevention strategy work for you by taking your HIV treatment as prescribed and seeing your healthcare provider regularly. Your ongoing healthcare should include blood tests to check your viral load and ensure that

Good news from CATIE: what people need to know about Undetectable viral load and HIV sexual transmission

published: February, 08, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Activism, CATIE, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Mental Health, Research, Sexual Health, Health, Treatment, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

CATIE says "people who are engaged in regular healthcare, are on treatment and have an ongoing undetectable viral load do not pass HIV to their sexual partners".

Good news from  CATIE: what people need to know about Undetectable viral load and HIV sexual transmission

This article previously appeared on the CATIE website here. Une version française est disponible ici. Studies have shown that HIV-positive people who are engaged in regular healthcare, are on treatment and have an ongoing undetectable viral load do not pass HIV to their sexual partners. This is great news! If I am HIV-positive how can I make this work for me? Talk to your doctor about treatment and an undetectable viral load as a prevention strategy. Before depending on this strategy,

The "epidemic" of misunderstanding about HIV

published: December, 02, 2016 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Hep B and C, CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Treatment, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

Laurie Edmiston of CATIE shares some thoughts about where we are in the fight against HIV.

The

Many Canadians likely think of HIV as a challenge experienced by other parts of the world, such as Sub-Saharan Africa. And they're correct. But it's also true Canada faces its own HIV epidemic-- a reality to be reminded of on World AIDS Day (December 1) and throughout the year. The most visible face of our HIV epidemic is the 75,000 Canadians living with the virus. Less visible, but perhaps equally significant, is the widespread lack of knowledge about new advances in HIV prevention. If more o