Articles tagged with: impact of undetectable viral load

The man that got it right

published: November, 14, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Social Media, Activism, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Features and Interviews, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

PositiveLite.com publisher Bob Leahy in conversation with Dr. Pietro Vernazza, famous author of the once-scorned Swiss Statement which predated U=U by ten years.

The man that got it right

Dr. Pietro Vernazza being interviewed  in the studio with Bruce Richman in Paris at !AS2017 About the Swiss Statement: Source aidsmap http://www.aidsmap.com/The-Swiss-Statement-and-its-repercussions/page/1746478/ “There is evidence of some groups of gay men knowing, from the late 1990s onwards, that people with an undetectable HIV viral load were much less infectious, and were using this knowledge in sexual decision-making. Public discussion of this became much more high profile after a p

Investigating where patients go when they leave HIV care

published: November, 06, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , CATIE, General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Sexual Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on research that begins to paint a picture of what happens when people living with HIV are "lost to follow-up."

Investigating where patients go when they leave HIV care

- Previous research has found HIV-positive Canadians stop attending follow-up HIV appointments at rates between 11% and 24%. - Alberta researchers find that many patients “lost to follow-up” are seeking healthcare outside HIV services, often in hospital emergency rooms. - This research has implications for programs that seek to re-engage patients in HIV care. Potent combination anti-HIV therapy (ART) can reduce levels of HIV in the blood (viral load) to very low levels that cannot be de

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

published: October, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, International AIDS Conference , As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Living with HIV, Media

Nearly 40% with an undetectable viral load still consider themselves infectious. Gus Cairns reports on a European study commissioned by Gilead Sciences.

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

A study commissioned by the drug company Gilead Sciences and conducted in five European countries has found that, compared with their HIV-negative peers, people with HIV still expect to die sooner and think they are less likely to achieve a long-term relationship. The results were announced yesterday during the 16th European AIDS Conference (EACS 2017) in Milan, Italy. The survey found that 54% of HIV-positive people considered HIV to be a barrier to sex with others, and of them 87% (47% o

How we talk about U=U and the importance of precise language

published: October, 19, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Activism, Gay Men, Media, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy on what words to use and what words to avoid when describing risk and ability to transmit applicable to an undetectable viral load – and why that’s important

How we talk about U=U and the importance of precise language

The language of HIV has evolved at an accelerated pace in recent years. It can be a struggle to keep up, to use the right words which are not only precise in meaning but don’t offend. And precision in language has never been more important around communicating that Undetectable = Untransmittable. The campaign's message has now reached over 60 countries around the globe, with endorsements from over 400 organizations. Journalists have covered the topic regularly, from CNN down. But do they a

What I've learned through training

published: October, 13, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Megan DePutter, Opinion Pieces

Megan DePutter reflects on some of the high points as she prepares to go on maternity leave.

What I've learned through training

I’ve spent the last 1.5 years delivering training on HIV and related topics in Scotland. The audience has been diverse – it’s included nurses, GP’s, infant feeding advisors, midwives, therapists, social workers, addictions and criminal justice workers, dieticians and occupational therapists, psychologists, early childcare workers, people who work with vulnerable adults, students and people in a wide variety of other roles! During this period I’ve delivered training for nearly 550 peo

Virally suppressed people have “effectively no risk” of transmitting HIV, says US CDC: but how many are suppressed?

published: October, 06, 2017 Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

Over 60% of gay men have viral suppression, but less than 30% of under 25s. From AIDSmap, Gus Cairns reports.

Virally suppressed people have “effectively no risk” of transmitting HIV, says US CDC: but how many are suppressed?

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) used 27 September, National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, to announce that HIV diagnoses had fallen in white gay and bisexual men and remained stable among African-American gay men between 2010 and 2014, its last complete year of figures. The CDC went further in its release: for the first time, it attributed this slowing of diagnoses to “the prevention effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART)” and said that data from

U = U: how well is the message getting through to people living with HIV and their doctors?

published: August, 23, 2017 Written by // T.J. Miller Categories // Activism, featured, Social Media, As Prevention , T.J. Miller, General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media

To help answer that question, T.J. Miller initiated a survey of HIV peers and physicians. Here are the results.

U = U: how well is the message getting through to people living with HIV and their doctors?

About two months ago, in anticipation of the upcoming International AIDS Society Conference in Paris, France, along with the United States Conference on AIDS in Washington, DC I decided to attempt a poll of both HIV-positive individuals and healthcare providers who treat HIV-positive clients. The topic of this poll was Undetectable Equals Untransmittable (U=U). In order to reach HIV-positive survey participants, I submitted posts for participants on Facebook to several HIV based groups. Thes

The evidence for U=U: why negligible risk is zero risk

published: August, 17, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Activism, As Prevention , General Health, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

From HIV i-Base, Simon Collins: "Purely theoretical risks are no longer a good enough level of evidence to sustain stigma and discrimination and certainly not criminalisation."

The evidence for U=U: why negligible risk is zero risk

Over the last year, hundreds of HIV organisations have joined a new campaign to endorse the statement that HIV transmission does not occur when viral load is undetectable on ART. And while the dramatic impact of ART on reducing HIV transmission has been known for a long time, it is new to say ART stops transmission completely. This change is especially important given that prejudice and discrimination against HIV positive people is still widespread. So while it is easy to simply answer “n

Views from the front lines: Getting to undetectable

published: August, 07, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Features and Interviews, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Sexual Health, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Media

From CATIE's "Prevention in Focus" spotlight on programming and research, three service providers speak of the barriers to testing and treatment their communities face.

Views from the front lines: Getting to undetectable

We spoke to three service providers to find their views and insights on the challenges facing their clients in getting an undetectable viral load: Norma Rabbitskin, Senior Health Nurse, Sturgeon Lake First Nation Health Centre, Saskatchewan Sem Teklemariam, Women’s Support Coordinator, Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention (Black CAP),Toronto, Ontario Deanna Macdonald, RN (c), BSN, Interior Health Clinical Care Coordinator – HIV and Health Outreach Team, Kelowna, British Co

Kenya as far as Undetectable equals Untransmittable (U=U) is concerned

published: July, 26, 2017 Written by // Kimutai Kemboi, Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Activism, As Prevention , Kimutai Kemboi, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

From Kenya, Kimutai Kemboi on the achievements and the challenges Kenya faces going forward in the fight against HIV.

Kenya as far as Undetectable equals Untransmittable (U=U) is concerned

As a developing country, Kenya still faces a number of challenges in almost all sectors, including the health sector. This poses a great threat when it comes to addressing health related issues. Such challenges include shortage of funds, inadequate specialized equipment among other things. Despite these difficulties, the Government of Kenya has put in place policies favoring activities that boost provision of health care services. These include a National Health Insurance Fund run by the gove

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