Exploring - Never Stop

Articles tagged with: antiretroviral therapy (ART)

HIV treatment is not only a life giver but a life saver.

published: February, 16, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Lifestyle, Revolving Door, Treatment, Living with HIV, Guest Authors, Media, Opinion Pieces

From Uganda, Matovu William's first article as a regular contributor to PositiveLite.com discusses the many benefits of antiretroviral theraoy (ART).

HIV treatment is not only a life giver but a life saver.

According to UNAIDS, there were approximately 36.7 million people worldwide living with HIV/AIDS at the end of 2016. Of these, 2.1 million were children (<15 years old). As of July 2017, 20.9 million people living with HIV were accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally, up from 15.8 million in June 2015, 7.5 million in 2010, and less than one million in 2000. HIV treatment known as Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is medication which is given to HIV positive people to treat HIV but it do

Will de-simplification of HIV treatment become common in high-income countries?

published: February, 14, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on a study exploring de-simplification as a cost-cutting measure.

Will de-simplification of HIV treatment become common in high-income countries?

- As more people start HIV treatment, researchers are exploring ways to cut costs - Single tablets can be replaced by a few pills comprising cheaper generic drugs - Alberta clinic projects $4.3 million saved by “de-simplifying” one treatment regimen Initiating and staying on HIV treatment (ART) results in most people having very low levels of HIV in their blood. Such low levels are commonly called undetectable and result in improved measures of health and projections of near-normal life

Generic drugs for HIV treatment may save money, but barriers to prescription make savings elusive

published: February, 08, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Media, Guest Authors

Scepticism among healthcare providers, patients and pharmacists about the safety and efficacy of generic medications is an important barrier. From AIDSmap, Keith Alcorn reports.

Generic drugs for HIV treatment may save money, but barriers to prescription make savings elusive

The potential savings from prescribing generic antiretrovirals predicted by economic models may be overstated and numerous barriers need to be overcome to bring down the cost of HIV treatment in higher-income countries, according to the findings of several recently-published analyses. Switching to cheaper generic versions of some antiretrovirals has been proposed as a means of freeing up money to treat more people with HIV in the United States and other higher-income countries where generics

Many Americans still get their HIV diagnosis years after infection

published: December, 07, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Media, Guest Authors

Heterosexual men had undiagnosed HIV longer than women who inject drugs or gay and bisexual men (a median of about five years, two years and three years, respectively).From AIDSmap, Liz Highleyman reports.

Many Americans still get their HIV diagnosis years after infection

Many people with HIV in the United States are still being diagnosed with HIV late, and therefore not getting the full therapeutic and prevention benefits of starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) early, according to the latest Vital Signs report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), released in advance of World AIDS Day. People at risk for HIV in the US are getting tested more often than they did in the past and are living with HIV for a shorter period of time bef

Starting ART immediately after HIV diagnosis cuts mortality risk by two-thirds for people with high CD4 cell counts

published: November, 08, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Media, Guest Authors

Over 12 months of follow-up, individuals who started antiretrovirals within 30 days of their diagnosis had a 63% reduction in their mortality risk compared to people who remained antiretroviral-naïve. From AIDSmap, Michael Carrter reports.

Starting ART immediately after HIV diagnosis cuts mortality risk by two-thirds for people with high CD4 cell counts

People with a high CD4 cell count who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately after diagnosis with HIV cut their 12-month mortality risk by two-thirds, according to research conducted in China and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The retrospective study involved over 35,000 people who were newly diagnosed with HIV between 2012 and 2014. All had a CD4 cell count above 500 cells/mm3. Over 12 months of follow-up, individuals who started antiretrovirals within 30 days of their d

Investigating where patients go when they leave HIV care

published: November, 06, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Research, International , Sexual Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on research that begins to paint a picture of what happens when people living with HIV are "lost to follow-up."

Investigating where patients go when they leave HIV care

- Previous research has found HIV-positive Canadians stop attending follow-up HIV appointments at rates between 11% and 24%. - Alberta researchers find that many patients “lost to follow-up” are seeking healthcare outside HIV services, often in hospital emergency rooms. - This research has implications for programs that seek to re-engage patients in HIV care. Potent combination anti-HIV therapy (ART) can reduce levels of HIV in the blood (viral load) to very low levels that cannot be de

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

published: October, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, International AIDS Conference , As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Guest Authors

Nearly 40% with an undetectable viral load still consider themselves infectious. Gus Cairns reports on a European study commissioned by Gilead Sciences.

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

A study commissioned by the drug company Gilead Sciences and conducted in five European countries has found that, compared with their HIV-negative peers, people with HIV still expect to die sooner and think they are less likely to achieve a long-term relationship. The results were announced yesterday during the 16th European AIDS Conference (EACS 2017) in Milan, Italy. The survey found that 54% of HIV-positive people considered HIV to be a barrier to sex with others, and of them 87% (47% o

80 days of HIV

published: October, 05, 2017 Written by // Alex Sparrowhawk Categories // Activism, Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Alex Sparrowhawk

Alex Sparrowhawk checks in and talks about his new project, "...to show a daily snapshot of life with the virus."

80 days of HIV

I’ve not written anything for a while, or more accurately I have written a lot and left the contents of my ramblings in the draft vaults of WordPress.com. So what’s going on in my life? Well I’ve been dating someone since May and it’s going well enough for us to venture on our first trip away this weekend. Work is good and over the summer I was so proud to see our Can’t Pass It On campaign launch as well as tick off a number of other projects I’ve been working on this year. M

New US PrEP cost-effectiveness model finds drug prices will need to drop substantially if HIV risk rises, or if adherence is only moderate

published: September, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Media, Guest Authors

"With high adherence, PrEP saves money in high-prevalence populations even at current costs." From AIDSmap, Gus Cairns reports.

New US PrEP cost-effectiveness model finds drug prices will need to drop substantially if HIV risk rises, or if adherence is only moderate

A new US model of the cost-effectiveness of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM), prepared by researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, finds that taking even one year of PrEP is more cost-effective than measures like kidney dialysis, if it is used by people belonging to populations where HIV prevalence is at least 10%. However, for PrEP to actually save money, relative to the lifetime cost of treating the HIV infections that would otherwise happen, either

Incidence of anal cancer has already peaked among HIV-positive gay men; reductions can be achieved with expanded ART coverage and screening

published: August, 17, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Media, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on the first study to predict the incidence of anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM long term, taking into account cART [combination antiretroviral therapy] coverage and individual CD4 cell trajectories.

Incidence of anal cancer has already peaked among HIV-positive gay men; reductions can be achieved with expanded ART coverage and screening

The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-positive gay men peaked in 2009 and will decline substantially by 2030, even with current levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage and no cancer-screening programme, Swiss investigators report in AIDS. Further significant reductions would be achieved with 100% treatment coverage and various screening strategies. These would be more effective at preventing cases of anal populationcancer than screening for cervical cancer among women in the gener

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