Articles tagged with: Michael Carter

Many gay/bisexual men currently taking PrEP would switch to injectable forms of the therapy should it become available

published: October, 12, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Sexual Health, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

"It removes the requirement to take daily treatment and the need to maintain high levels of treatment adherence." From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Many gay/bisexual men currently taking PrEP would switch to injectable forms of the therapy should it become available

Approximately a third of gay and bisexual men who are currently taking oral (tenofovir/emtricitabine) pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) would prefer long-acting injectable PrEP should it become available, investigators report in AIDS and Behavior. Individuals were less likely to prefer injectable PrEP if they had concerns about the level of protection it provided against HIV and/or about its durability. “About one-third of GBM [gay and bisexual men] currently taking oral PrEP would prefer LA

Depression highly prevalent among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

published: October, 02, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door

Globally, the mental health of HIV-positive individuals is an increasing concern. From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Depression highly prevalent among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Depression is very common among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis published in PLOS One. Prevalence ranged between 9 and 32%, but differed between screening tools and also according to antiretroviral therapy (ART) status. Risk factors for depression included economic hardship, female sex and immunosuppression, but there was little consistency between studies. “This analysis of the available most recent literature

Incidence of anal cancer has already peaked among HIV-positive gay men; reductions can be achieved with expanded ART coverage and screening

published: August, 17, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on the first study to predict the incidence of anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM long term, taking into account cART [combination antiretroviral therapy] coverage and individual CD4 cell trajectories.

Incidence of anal cancer has already peaked among HIV-positive gay men; reductions can be achieved with expanded ART coverage and screening

The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-positive gay men peaked in 2009 and will decline substantially by 2030, even with current levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage and no cancer-screening programme, Swiss investigators report in AIDS. Further significant reductions would be achieved with 100% treatment coverage and various screening strategies. These would be more effective at preventing cases of anal populationcancer than screening for cervical cancer among women in the gener

Viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting ART is associated with a significant ten-year mortality risk

published: July, 12, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

“Low-level viral loads between 400 and 999 copies/ml shortly after starting ART appear to place patients at a significantly higher 10-year risk of death than patients with viral loads under 20 copies/ml..." From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting ART is associated with a significant ten-year mortality risk

A viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting HIV therapy is associated with a substantial ten-year mortality risk, investigators from the United States report in the online edition of AIDS. People with a viral load between 400 and 999 copies/ml had a 20% mortality risk, similar to the 23% risk observed in people with a viral load between 1000 and 4 million copies/ml. In contrast, the mortality risk was only 14% for individuals who rapidly achieved complete viral suppressio

Researchers say rule out depression, anxiety, unemployment and other stresses before blaming cognitive impairment for everyday difficulties

published: June, 29, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Mental Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

"Failure to recognise these important elements of patients’ lived experiences risks diagnostic delay, failure to address important needs, unnecessary investigations and further anxiety.” From AIDSmap. Michael Carter reports on the CIPHER Study.

Researchers say rule out depression, anxiety, unemployment and other stresses before blaming cognitive impairment for everyday difficulties

One in five people living with HIV in a European study reported a decline in everyday functioning as a result of cognitive problems such as memory loss, difficulties in solving problems, poor concentration or reduced attention span, researchers from the CIPHER study group report in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. But, researchers say, people who reported these problems were also more likely to have comorbid conditions, to be depressed or anxious, to be unemployed and e

Agreements with cash incentives boost patient adherence to HIV therapy and rates of viral suppression

published: June, 12, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on a study that demonstrated the feasibility of using commitment contracts in HIV care.

Agreements with cash incentives boost patient adherence to HIV therapy and rates of viral suppression

People who enter into a contract with their HIV healthcare provider to receive cash incentives in return for high levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence are more likely to achieve sustained viral suppression compared to people in a control arm, investigators from the United States report in the online edition of AIDS. The study recruited individuals with ongoing viral replication despite at least six months of ART. Individuals who entered into a commitment contract were appro

People with HIV have impaired respiratory health, even when viral load is undetectable

published: June, 08, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Health, International , Smoking Cessation , Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on a study that explores the relationship between HIV infection and respiratory health in the modern ART era.

People with HIV have impaired respiratory health, even when viral load is undetectable

HIV-positive people have impaired respiratory health, even when they have viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy (ART), investigators from London report in HIV Medicine. Respiratory health was compared between HIV-positive and HIV-negative outpatients. Individuals with HIV had poorer respiratory health and were more likely to report breathlessness than HIV-negative participants, findings which remained unchanged when analysis focused on ART-treated HIV-positive people with an undetec

Women significantly more likely than men to have suboptimal adherence to HIV therapy

published: February, 27, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Canadian research "shows that sex maintains a significant and independent effect on adherence.” For AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Women significantly more likely than men to have suboptimal adherence to HIV therapy

Women are more likely than men to have poor adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), according to Canadian research published in HIV Medicine. Adherence was monitored in a cohort of over 4000 people in British Columbia over 14 years. After controlling for injecting drug use (IDU) and ethnicity, 57% of women and 77% of men attained optimum 95% adherence. “Our findings indicate that women are significantly less likely to achieve optimal adherence to cART than men,” com

Living with diagnosed HIV infection for a long time is associated with poor quality of life

published: February, 23, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Social Media, Gay Men, General Health, Mental Health, Research, Sexual Health, Health, International , Living with HIV, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Long term survivor news. From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on the Antiretrovirals, Sexual Transmission Risk and Attitudes (ASTRA) study.

Living with diagnosed HIV infection for a long time is associated with poor quality of life

Longer time living with diagnosed HIV infection is strongly associated with depression, anxiety and poor quality of life, according to UK research published in HIV Medicine. Older age in itself was not associated with symptoms of distress or poor mental health but did have an association with lower physical functioning. “The association between longer time with diagnosed HIV infection and poorer health is likely to be related to earlier calendar time of diagnosis: having been diagnos

Two-thirds of HIV clinics in the UK don't think there's a current need for specialist services for older HIV-positive patients

published: February, 14, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Aging, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Current Affairs, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Only a minority of centres have specialist clinics for management of co-morbidities. For AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Two-thirds of HIV clinics in the UK don't think there's a current need for specialist services for older HIV-positive patients

(Here is what is happening in the USA) Two-thirds of HIV clinics in the UK do not think there is a current need for specialist care services targeted at older adults, investigators report in HIV Medicine. “This is important as, although there is no current need because of a lack of a significant proportion of older adults within certain services, there is a clear trajectory towards cohort ageing within the UK,” write the authors. “We would anticipate clinic populations of older adult

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