Articles tagged with: HIV_gov

PositiveLite.com is named Canada’s most influential HIV website for the fifth year in a row

published: December, 04, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, International , Living with HIV, Media, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Healthline announces its annual HIV Influencer Honours. PositiveLite.com is number one in Canada. Elsewhere listed are allies Bruce Richman (Person of the Year) and the Prevention Access Campaign and U=U (Campaign of the Year.)

PositiveLite.com is named Canada’s most influential HIV website for the fifth year in a row

For the fifth consecutive year, PositiveLite.com has won an award for the best Canadian-focused HIV website, amongst a stellar list of influencers. The presenter is Healthline, a U.S.-based giant in the field of web-based consumer health information . Our citation says this: “PositivelIte.com remains a leading voice in HIV news and advocacy in Canada. For the fifth consecutive year, we name them the top Canadian HIV resource. This year the publication became a powerful advocate for the #Ue

Embracing a broader population, not erasing AIDS: government official, living with HIV, reflects on the name change to 'HIV.gov'

published: July, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Revolving Door, International , Guest Authors, Media, Opinion Pieces

From TheBody.com, JD Davids interviews Richard Wolitski, Ph.D., director of the Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Embracing a broader population, not erasing AIDS: government official, living with HIV, reflects on the name change to 'HIV.gov'

To read the complete article by J. D. Davids visit TheBody.com, here. Last year, eight million people went to AIDS.gov to find information about, well, HIV/AIDS. But from this point forward, those millions and more will instead find themselves at HIV.gov. After years of planning, the central United States government website on HIV/AIDS has changed its name to reflect the changes of the fourth decade of the epidemic, when people with HIV who receive effective treatment can expect a near-nor