Articles tagged with: HIV medications

Medications: A love and hate relationship

published: August, 06, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Newly Diagnosed, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Living with HIV, Guest Authors

Some of us like talking about our meds. Guest writer RYU Matsumoto from The Philippines is no exception.

Medications: A love and hate relationship

I started taking “medications” when I discovered about my shingles and GERD. I really thought undergoing such medications will be the worst. It took me two weeks to finish my Aciclovir (my medication for shingles). My Omeprazole medication took more than two weeks. I stopped it, but I had to take it again after several days. I had to take more medications during my confinement, and they seriously took their toll on my body. I can feel it. I can really feel it.  QUADTAB Experience… Fai

Sleep Tight

published: November, 24, 2013 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // CATIE, General Health, Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Living with HIV

A good night’s sleep is an elusive dream for many people living with HIV. Former insomniac David Evans tells us how to hit the hay and sleep soundly in this article from CATIE.

Sleep Tight

This article previously appeared in The Positive Side, a publication of CATIE, here. Une version française est disponible ici.  Before starting HIV medication, flight attendant Terry Wong never had a problem with jet lag or sleeping. “I could sleep just about anywhere anytime,” he recalls. “If I was tired and there was a bed, I would pass out and be snoring in minutes.” Diagnosed with HIV 15 years ago, Terry’s health took a nosedive seven years later—his weight dropped from 175

Exhausting all avenues

published: September, 10, 2013 Categories // General Health, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV

Jack Frost is having medication issues that are likely causing his habitual tiredness – and he wants his life back. But things are improving . .

I have mentioned in numerous posts about my exhaustion issue. I am tired all the time. I go to work from 8 am to 4 pm and then I come home and usually fall asleep by 5 pm. I wake up anywhere between 10 pm to 1 am, I have something to eat, and then go back to bed.  I have had numerous tests. I went for a stress test, where you walk on a treadmill and they hook up electrodes to you. That came back normal. I have had numerous blood tests; all came back normal. I had a CT scan on my heart; came

Show and tell

published: July, 11, 2013 Categories // Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

Ken Monteith doesn’t hide his meds. “I like to show and talk about my meds precisely because it seems so taboo. I’m not ashamed of them; they are a fact of my life” he says.

Show and tell

The other day I was out with some friends, taking in a hipster marching band at the Montréal Jazz Festival, when one of my friends asked me about a photo I had posted of my meds. Do I really take that many pills every day? How many, exactly? And what are they?  When I have had that experience before, it was because my niece was studying to be a pharmacist assistant and had an interest in seeing them. What usually happens is that people look away, or feel like they are intruding on something

Sharing responsibility for your treatment: you know it makes sense

published: February, 14, 2013 Categories // General Health, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

Dave R writes...many people take their daily HIV and other medications as prescribed plus vitamins and supplements in the belief that they’ve got it all covered. However, how much do we really understand about what goes into our system?

Sharing responsibility for your treatment: you know it makes sense

‘Knowledge is power only if man knows what facts not to bother with.’ Robert Staughton Lynd How much interest do you take in what you’re swallowing every day? Okay, wrong article: stop sniggering at the back of the class! No seriously, do we know exactly what’s in the medications and supplements that we take and do we know what they do to our body and exactly how they affect our health? Of course we don’t and nobody reasonably expects you to. However, we do tend to bury our heads,

Adherence, Adherence, Adherence.

published: July, 03, 2012 Categories // Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

MT O’Shaughnessy asks how much room for failure is there in the perfect world of HIV med compliance, and ponders on the choices between “100% and death” where we’re told exists no grey zone.

Stretching as I head outside to get some good old fashioned air, aka a smoke, I realize that I’ve not looked at the time for a bit.  And with the practiced ease of a member of the North American urban tribe, I check my phone.  And it hits me.  I’m late.  There is this moment wherein I am sometimes reminded that no matter how many targeted messages I see, broadcast through almost Stepford Wife-ish smiles of Absolutely Fine Futures, or how many campaigns are run, it really isn’t ‘j

HIV and the Older Patient

published: April, 04, 2012 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // General Health, Newly Diagnosed, Health, Revolving Door, Treatment, Living with HIV, Guest Authors, Population Specific

New US HIV Treatment Guidelines which discuss when to start antiretroviral therapy also include an important new section on HIV and the older patient.

HIV and the Older Patient

Editor’s note:  The most eye-catching piece of information here – and this is new - is the statement that if you’re living with HIV, over 50 years of age and haven’t yet started antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services now recommend HIV treatment, regardless of your CD4 cell count. PositiveLite.com discussed the guidelines relating to the general  HIV-positive population here. Today we focus specifically on the section relating to HIV and aging

There’s a Pill for That

published: February, 06, 2012 Categories // Health, Treatment, Living with HIV

One pill makes you larger, one pill makes you small.....

With the rise of new media and the shift from Web 2.0 to Web 3.0 threatening to overtake us all, who knew that the themes of personalisation, usability, standardisation, participation and mashups which are becoming part of our daily lives have long been established in HIV treatment – yes, that’s right. We have a disease but there’s a pill for that. Now, without being complacent as to the precariousness of the treatment situation which continues to face us and the fact we are still witho

Or not to conceive (part 2)... le français suit

published: October, 05, 2011 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // CATIE, Health, Sexual Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

Some people with HIV want to have babies. Some don’t. CATIE covers both. Certaines PVVIH veulent des enfants. D’autres, non. CATIE les appuie, dans un cas comme dans l’autre.

Or not to conceive (part 2)... le français suit

In To conceive… the first part of this two-part post, we talked about pregnancy planning options for people with HIV who want to get pregnant. In this post, let’s look at the flip side—wanting not to get pregnant. Not having a baby Many people with HIV decide they don’t want or need a visit from the stork and so look to contraception. Options include physical barriers (condoms, diaphragms and cervical caps), hormonal contraceptives (oral contraceptives, injectable contraceptives a

IAS ROME 2011: The Latest on Lipodystrophy

published: July, 22, 2011 Written by // Brian Finch - Founder Categories // International AIDS Conference , Events, Features and Interviews, Health, Brian Finch

A rapid review of a poster looking at trends in lipodystrophy.

IAS ROME 2011: The Latest on Lipodystrophy

Lipodystrophy is the fat accumulation around areas such as the belly, and the neck, where it is commonly known as "buffalo hump".  It is quite common in people living with HIV. This Brian Finch video relates to a 12-year cohort study in Australia which tracked the prevalence of liposystropohy over time.  It covers  prevalence (how common ther condition is) , weight gains, waist measuments, cholestreol levels, aging and many other factors.

[12  >>