Articles tagged with: HIV and racism

Learning from Saskatchewan’s HIV emergency

published: March, 22, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Hep B and C, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Mental Health, Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Media

"...as a nurse, and as a human, I remain disappointed at what I perceive to be the lack of an adequate and equitable HIV response in Saskatchewan." From CATIE Blog, Susanne Nicolay shares the benefit of her 24-plus years' experience there.

Learning from Saskatchewan’s HIV emergency

Saskatchewan has led the country in the rate of new HIV infections and the proportion of people living with HIV since 2009. The HIV epidemic in this province is unique from other jurisdictions in Canada in that more than three-quarters of our new infections occur in people who use injection drugs (the Canadian average is less than 14%). The roots of public health challenges such as HIV and hepatitis C, however, go much deeper than addiction and substance abuse. They started long ago, and they

Skewed Stories

published: July, 05, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Activism, Current Affairs, Women, Features and Interviews, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Legal, Media, Population Specific

Media stories of people prosecuted for not disclosing their status show Black men on trial in disproportionate numbers. What impact does this have on African, Caribbean and Black communities? From CATIE's Positive Side, Sané Dube investigates.

Skewed Stories

“In a word, it’s dehumanizing.” Robert Bardston is talking about media coverage of HIV non-disclosure cases. I’ve spent the past couple of months engaged in a series of poignant, inspiring and sometimes-heartbreaking conversations about the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure. I am trying to understand how mainstream media stories on the issue impact African, Caribbean and Black (ACB) people across the country. Robert and I are speaking on the phone—miles stretch between his Medici