Articles tagged with: Europe

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

published: October, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, International AIDS Conference , As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Living with HIV, Media

Nearly 40% with an undetectable viral load still consider themselves infectious. Gus Cairns reports on a European study commissioned by Gilead Sciences.

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

A study commissioned by the drug company Gilead Sciences and conducted in five European countries has found that, compared with their HIV-negative peers, people with HIV still expect to die sooner and think they are less likely to achieve a long-term relationship. The results were announced yesterday during the 16th European AIDS Conference (EACS 2017) in Milan, Italy. The survey found that 54% of HIV-positive people considered HIV to be a barrier to sex with others, and of them 87% (47% o

Legalisation of sex work associated with lower prevalence of HIV in sex workers

published: April, 03, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Women, Sexual Health, Health, International , Revolving Door, Legal, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody reports on a study suggesting that legalization of some aspects of sex work might help reduce HIV prevalence in this high-risk group.

Legalisation of sex work associated with lower prevalence of HIV in sex workers

Countries that have legalized some aspects of sex work have fewer sex workers living with HIV than countries that criminalize all aspects of sex work, according to an ecological analysis of 27 European countries published online ahead of print in The Lancet HIV. The association remained statistically significant after adjustment for countries’ economic development, HIV prevalence, antiretroviral therapy coverage and proportion of sex workers who inject drugs. “Our findings suggest th

Educational attainment associated with health outcomes after starting HIV therapy

published: October, 21, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Living with HIV

From AIDSmap.com, Michael Carter reports on a study which "observed such health differentials for an eighteen-year period in eight European countries where access to health care and cART is universal.”

Educational attainment associated with health outcomes after starting HIV therapy

People with HIV who have lower educational attainment have poorer outcomes after starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), according to data from a large European cohort collaboration published in the online edition of AIDS. Rates of mortality and AIDS decreased with increasing education level, and education was also associated with virological suppression and CD4 count at the time of cART initiation. “The striking differences in mortality and clinical responses to cART could n

How well is STI testing in gay men being done?

published: November, 16, 2013 Categories // Gay Men, Research, Sexual Health, Health, Revolving Door, International , Guest Authors, Population Specific , Sex and Sexuality

Urgent need to improve sexually transmitted infection screening for MSM in Europe. Lack of anal swabs and physical examinations likely to leave infections undiagnosed, aidsmap reports.

How well is STI testing in gay men being done?

This article by Roger Pebody first appeared on aidsmap.com here. Across 40 large European cities, less than one third of men who have sex with men (MSM) have been screened for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the past year, according to a study in the November issue of Sexually Transmitted Infections. Whereas blood tests were commonly performed, the number of men tested for genital or anal infections, or being physically examined, was generally low and varied substantially between c