Articles tagged with: HIV stigma

The Death of the Pariah

published: March, 03, 2012 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Women, Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors

Writer Jeannie Wraight had this to say on her blog at HIV Haven about undetectable viral load "please, don't let anyone, including yourself, make you feel diseased or contagious or like a threat ever again."

The Death of the Pariah

Almost everyone with HIV has felt from time to time, or been made to feel, like a "pariah." We've all heard the word. Most of us know the feeling. As if other people need to be protected from us. We've heard people say "HIV is the new leprosy" or in our defence "HIV's not leprosy, you know." How about the ad with the scorpion in bed as if we were poison? Who hasn't been faced with stigma or rejection, or the fear of it when telling a new potential partner about our status? Or been in a relati

Health is Freedom

published: February, 27, 2012 Categories // Activism, Gay Men, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Ring the bells that still can ring, forget your perfect offering, there is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in. –Leonard Cohen

Health is Freedom

One hundred years before the onslaught of AIDS, James Kent, a brilliant philosopher and homeopathic doctor, defined health as freedom. Now that HIV stigma has been institutionalized to the point of criminalization, Poz people are under attack by our own judicial system for not disclosing our status with sexual partners. To be healthy one needs to burn fever bright to fight off the oppressor within and without. To be healthy we need to fight for our mutual rights to be free. From a psychologic

Anything For Comedy! (Well... Almost)

published: February, 12, 2012 Categories // Activism, Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors, Opinion Pieces

Guest writer Jim Swimm: “I could get angry, ranting and raving at every offensive reference to HIV/AIDS, or find another approach. Is it possible to keep my sense of humor while trying to educate and raise awareness".

Anything For Comedy! (Well... Almost)

There are few issues about which I feel more strongly than HIV/AIDS awareness and I take my advocacy/activism quite seriously, for a variety of reasons both globally-effective and intimately personal. I've found Twitter to be a fantastic resource for me in finding individuals, charity organizations, and hospitals/research centers to educate myself, lend support, and a million other uses when it comes to the disease. I cannot recommend it enough in this regard. But...there's a downside, of cou

One Blood: Youth Linked in Action

published: January, 09, 2012 Written by // John McCullagh - Publisher emeritus Categories // Activism, Current Affairs, International , Living with HIV, John McCullagh

Capturing the voices of youth in Jamaica and the Caribbean Diaspora in Canada, a powerful 20-minute documentary takes you into the hearts, minds, experiences and struggles of those living with and affected by HIV

One Blood: Youth Linked in Action

Youth in the Caribbean and the Caribbean Diaspora in Canada face many similar issues with respect to the risk of contracting HIV. An international project that linked youth from Jamaica and Ontario to address these issues resulted in a powerful 20-minute video documentary that takes you into the hearts, experiences and struggles of those living with and affected by HIV. You can see the video here. You can also read more about the issues facing these youth on the website of the Interagency Co

My story has no trauma

published: October, 13, 2011 Written by // Wayne Bristow - Positive Life Categories // Living with HIV, Wayne Bristow

Wayne Bristow on public speaking when the story isn’t a dramatic one.

My story has no trauma

Last winter I attended a two day workshop called Speaker's Bureau taught by PWA (the People With AIDS Foundation) to learn how to tell my story and put a face to this disease. Later, I was able to tell it to a group of university students and I sat on a panel for a conference held by my local ASO (AIDS Service Organization). It isn’t a lot of experience but I have been able to tell my story through my blogging as well. I have been involved in many other workshops and training courses where p

Access Denied

published: August, 29, 2011 Categories // Guest Authors, Opinion Pieces, Louis "Kengi" Carr

Strong words from our LA friend on problems Black and Latino HIVers in the US have in accessing testing and other HIV services in their own communities. “Show me the clinics in the areas they are most needed” says Kengi.

Access Denied

When all is said and done, it will always come down to access. And let’s face it, when it comes to access to HIV testing and care for populations of color (Black and Latino) there's really no such thing. We've all seen the numbers and at every single HIV update, medical update, HIV conference and every single article written about HIV as it pertains to populations of color, things are always the same. Same numbers, same words used, only with different pictures and fancy word spins to make it

Sorting my friends from my acquaintances for the sake of trust and support

published: May, 19, 2011 Categories // Wayne Bristow

Wayne Bristow ventured in to the chat rooms and found out first hand what stigma really feels like.

Sorting my friends from my acquaintances for the sake of trust and support

Over the past few years I have lost part of the support team that I had in place or thought I had. And its’ all because of what happened in the internet chat-rooms. In my days of looking for love in all the wrong places, chat-rooms seemed to be a good place for me to find friends and possibly meet someone to date. It all came to an abrupt halt last year when I had my HIV status plastered all over the chat-room because of a difference of opinion with some individuals who were supposed to be m

Assimilation in the Land of Cows - Part Two

published: April, 20, 2011 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Bob Leahy - Publisher

Drawn from life: a photo-essay in which Bob Leahy continues his exploration of the role of minorities, including gay men and people with HIV in particular, in his and other rural communities

Assimilation in the Land of Cows - Part Two

(Part One appears here) The notion that rural Canada is unwelcoming of minorities may in fact be true in some places, I don’t know. It certainly prevents some queer rural folks proclaiming they’re gay. It certainly inhibits HIV positive folks from disclosing their status more often than not. When I first moved to the country thirteen years ago, I met another guy who was out as a gay man, but not ready to announce his positive status to the world. “People will burn your house down if you

Stand-out in the Sun

published: April, 18, 2011 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Features and Interviews, Bob Leahy - Publisher

An interview with a remarkable man. His name is Paul Gallegos, he’s an HIV activist and you can find him, when he’s not public speaking, out on the streets in the hot California sun promoting HIV testing to motorists and passers-by.

Stand-out in the Sun

I first came across the work of Paul Gallegos through Twitter. (He’s @pauly1999) Paul uses social media voraciously in support of his advocacy for people living with HIV and the need for testing of those who aren’t. One Twitter trail led to another, which in turn led me to find a story about Paul  in a Palm Springs journal. The bare bones of his story are this. In 1999, Paul already had years of heavy drinking and drug use behind him. In preparation for a construction job, he’d deci

Racism and LGBT Health

published: April, 12, 2011 Categories // Health, Sex and Sexuality

Devan Nambiar connects the dots:HIV status, and the intersections of oppression with stigma, alienation, isolation, and discrimination.

Racism brings either discomfort or disgust for most. As gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) persons we have been fighting oppression and discrimination to gain respect and acceptance in the mainstream hetero-normative society. Add in HIV status, and the intersections of oppression increases a hundred times with stigma, alienation, isolation, and discrimination (SAID).   Next, add to the equation a racialized HIV positive person, dealing with racism and SAID. Or if you are a ra

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