Women

Iris's story: "I thought the doctor must be mistaken"

published: April, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Newly Diagnosed, Women, Health, Guest Authors, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Finding out late in life you are HIV-positive can be a shock. Here is how Guelph, Ontario’s iris Budd handled it with the help of her local AIDS Service Organization

Iris's story:

Back in 2005 I ended up in the hospital, deathly ill. The doctor first thought that I had a brain tumor (cancer). I had been in a coma for 2 weeks and when I came out of it, I couldn’t use my left side, as it was paralyzed. The doctor diagnosed me and summoned my children to the hospital, because he said, your mother probably won’t live. They said they had to perform a brain biopsy, so they shaved a triangle out of my hair and drilled a hole in my scalp to take a small part of my brain.

Attending CAHR2017 as a CATIE rapporteur

published: April, 13, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Aging, Social Media, As Prevention , Conferences, Gay Men, Youth, Mental Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Women, Health, Legal, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver reports back on #CAHR2017

Attending CAHR2017 as a CATIE rapporteur

As I prepared to attend CAHR2017 in Montreal I was elated, but a bit nervous as well. I hadn’t qualified for a community scholarship but had been accepted as a CATIE rapporteur. This meant I’d be covering the event for CATIE as well as for PositiveLite.com and then on the final day, my fellow rapporteurs and I would present a report back to the rest of the conference with a distillation of what we’d seen and heard. So yes, I had butterflies, mostly because I haven’t done much science w

The capsid inhibitor—a new class to enter clinical trials

published: April, 13, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, As Prevention , CATIE, Youth, General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, Sexual Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, International , Treatment, Media

From CATIE: "This finding suggests that the capsid inhibitor has potential for intermittent dosing in people—perhaps every one or two months."

The capsid inhibitor—a new class to enter clinical trials

Most approved anti-HIV drugs work by interfering with an enzyme and/or protein that is needed by HIV-infected cells to make new viruses. A journey through the cell The capsid is the name given to the proteins that surround HIV’s genetic material. Upon HIV attaching itself to a target cell of the immune system, the virus sends its genetic material (RNA) into the cell. As the genetic material is surrounded by the capsid, it is protected from detection by the cell’s internal sensors. The ca

Legalisation of sex work associated with lower prevalence of HIV in sex workers

published: April, 03, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Research, Health, Sexual Health, Revolving Door, International , Legal, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody reports on a study suggesting that legalization of some aspects of sex work might help reduce HIV prevalence in this high-risk group.

Legalisation of sex work associated with lower prevalence of HIV in sex workers

Countries that have legalized some aspects of sex work have fewer sex workers living with HIV than countries that criminalize all aspects of sex work, according to an ecological analysis of 27 European countries published online ahead of print in The Lancet HIV. The association remained statistically significant after adjustment for countries’ economic development, HIV prevalence, antiretroviral therapy coverage and proportion of sex workers who inject drugs. “Our findings suggest th

Q&A with Oghenowede Eyawo: research points to major shifts in mortality and causes of death among people living with HIV

published: March, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, As Prevention , General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Women, Health, Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors

Two recent studies by the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) point to what else has changed now that people living with HIV are expected to live much longer lives.

Q&A with Oghenowede Eyawo: research points to major shifts in mortality and causes of death among people living with HIV

People with HIV are now living longer, and are less likely to die from an AIDS-defining illness. What do we know about their health and quality of life today? People with HIV who are receiving combination antiretroviral drugs can now live full, long lives—increasingly comparable to those who are HIV-negative. Two recent studies by the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) point to what else has changed now that people living with HIV are expected to live much longer lives. One study

HIV: prosecution or prevention? HIV is not a crime

published: March, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Youth, Current Affairs, Women, International , Revolving Door, Legal, Guest Authors, Living with HIV

From POZ, an excerpt from Sean Strub's book, The War on Sex, edited by David M. Halperin and Trevor Hoppe.

HIV: prosecution or prevention? HIV is not a crime

This excerpt from Sean Strub's book, The War on Sex previously appeared at POZ, here. Iowan Nick Rhoades is HIV-positive and has had an undetectable viral load for many years, making it virtually impossible for him to sexually transmit the virus. When he had sex with a man he met online in 2008, he also used a condom. Despite these protective measures, Rhoades was prosecuted and convicted for not disclosing his HIV status to his partner before they had sex. He was sentenced to 25 years i

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

published: March, 22, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Social Media, Conferences, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Research, Women, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Liz Highleyman reports on several studies looking into the efffects of HIV on brain function.

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains a poorly-understood co-morbidity in HIV-positive people. Wh

Women: What HIV/AIDS organisations aren’t telling us about our amazing bodies!

published: March, 09, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Social Media, Women, Sexual Health, Health, International , Megan DePutter, Opinion Pieces

Megan DePutter:"there’s a considerable lack of understanding, respect and information-sharing going on about the basic elements of women’s sexual health, enjoyment, and reproduction."

Women: What HIV/AIDS organisations aren’t telling us about our amazing bodies!

When delivering training on HIV transmission, I like to ask the participants to name the five bodily fluids that can transmit HIV. Blood is always stated first. Next, the participants will (incorrectly) state saliva. People usually get semen next. And often one person will identify breastmilk. The remaining two tend to be a bit of a puzzle. The answers are of course, anal mucous and vaginal fluid. I have yet to encounter any participant who is not already working/volunteering in the field wh

Breastfeeding with an undetectable viral load: what do we know?

published: March, 07, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Social Media, Women, Health, International , Megan DePutter

Megan DePutter on why undetectable does not equal untransmittable in the case of breastfeeding, but why women should be supported to make an informed choice anyway

Breastfeeding with an undetectable viral load: what do we know?

I’m not a mother and sometimes I think that when it comes to breastfeeding I should just keep my big trap shut. I have started and stopped this blog so many times. But I’ve decided to write it and here’s why. I don’t think women are given enough information about breastfeeding. And I don’t think their choices are respected enough. I believe that women should be empowered to make their own choices about breastfeeding and they should be supported – not policed – in these decision

Views from the front lines: PrEP in Canada

published: March, 01, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, CATIE, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Media

CATIE spoke to three service providers about PrEP and finds very different conditions in different regions, but a common need for PrEP access.

Views from the front lines: PrEP in Canada

We spoke to three service providers to find their views and insights on how they talk to their clients about PrEP: Holly Taylor, Women's HIV/AIDS Community Development Coordinator, Regional HIV/AIDS Connection, London, Ontario Brook Biggin, Community Education Facilitator, HIV Edmonton; Founder, Edmonton Men’s Health Collective, Edmonton, Alberta Jessica Quijano, Travailleuse de rue, RÉZO, Montreal, Quebec Holly Taylor Are the communities or clients that you work with a

Like the Mark of Cain, we carry stigma with us.

published: March, 01, 2017 Written by // Michael Yoder Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Youth, Newly Diagnosed, Mental Health, Women, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Michael Yoder

Michael Yoder: "... I wonder if, in some ways, we perpetuate stigma by trying to diminish it."

Like the Mark of Cain, we carry stigma with us.

"Then the Lord put a mark on Cain so that no one who found him would kill him" Genesis 4:15-16 I see a lot of campaigns about reducing stigma and each time I see a new one there's a little knot in my stomach that makes me uncomfortable. While I strongly believe that we need to reduce HIV stigma and discrimination, I wonder if, in some ways, we perpetuate stigma by trying to diminish it. Here some people's heads will be exploding, but nonetheless, every time we talk about how we're stigmatiz

Trump seems to support Bush’s AIDS program for now... but will it be hobbled by his other policies?

published: February, 27, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Activism, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Women, Revolving Door, International , Guest Authors, Opinion Pieces

As of 2016, the program helped provide life-saving antiretroviral treatment for over 11.5 million people, trained 220,000 health-care workers, and facilitated counseling and testing for over 74.3 million people. For The Atlantic, Joseph Frankel reports.

Trump seems to support Bush’s AIDS program for now... but will it be hobbled by his other policies?

To read the complete article by Joseph Frankel, visit The Atlantic, here. Despite concerns raised during the presidential transition, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) seems poised to continue its work. The multi-billion dollar government initiative created by George W. Bush in 2003 has worked with remarkable success to treat and prevent HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis in a number of countries around the world, and is often hailed as his greatest legacy. The

Women significantly more likely than men to have suboptimal adherence to HIV therapy

published: February, 27, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Living with HIV, Media

Canadian research "shows that sex maintains a significant and independent effect on adherence.” For AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Women significantly more likely than men to have suboptimal adherence to HIV therapy

Women are more likely than men to have poor adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), according to Canadian research published in HIV Medicine. Adherence was monitored in a cohort of over 4000 people in British Columbia over 14 years. After controlling for injecting drug use (IDU) and ethnicity, 57% of women and 77% of men attained optimum 95% adherence. “Our findings indicate that women are significantly less likely to achieve optimal adherence to cART than men,” com

Research update: meta-analysis shows PrEP is effective in women with high adherence

published: February, 24, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, CATIE, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Women, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors

From CATIE, Camille Arkell discusses the results of five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included women.

Research update: meta-analysis shows PrEP is effective in women with high adherence

Une version française est disponible ici. What do we know about PrEP effectiveness in women? Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has demonstrated high levels of effectiveness in research conducted among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM);1however, research in women has shown mixed results,2,3,4,5,6 leading to concerns that PrEP may be less effective for women. Of the five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included women, 2,3,4,5,6 two trials (in women alone) fou

Should gays defend Milo? No.

published: February, 22, 2017 Written by // Michael Bouldin Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Arts and Entertainment, Gay Men, Women, Performances, International , Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Michael Bouldin

Michael Bouldin on Milo: "... sexist, transphobic, racist, pick what you wish from the long catalogue of human cruelties, he will likely embrace it this very instant, already has, or will at some future time of greater convenience."

Should gays defend Milo? No.

The question arises – I suppose – whether Milo should be able to rely on the good offices of Gay, Inc℠ or of the broader velvet mafia in media and culture. We do tend to defend our own, even if only for the reason that they are indeed our own. Do we, more specifically gay white men, do so for conservatives as reliably as for liberals? I propose that this is the wrong question to ask. My guess would be that Milo won’t be afforded the warm embrace of Ellen or Anderson Cooper, let al

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