Treatment Guidelines -including when to start

When to start treatment?

published: April, 03, 2012 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

New US guidelines released just last week recommend treatment for all people with HIV infection. Are they a step in the right direction, something that others should consider following? Bob Leahy reports.

When to start treatment?

Newly updated US treatment guidelines are recommending antiretroviral treatment for all people with HIV infection, rather than starting at a particular CD4 range. But for those about to start treatment and their doctors, it’s not quite that simple; the strength of the recommendations varies by category of patient. Here is how a simplified scale looks: CD4 count less than 350 – strong recommendation CD4 count 350 to 500 - strong recommendation CD4 count over 500 – moderate recommend

RX Coles Notes: Starting Treatment Early – emerging results

published: December, 16, 2011 Written by // Brian Finch - Founder Categories // Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Revolving Door, Treatment

People starting treatment early fared better in this study.

 RX Coles Notes: Starting Treatment Early – emerging results

A recent study, published in MedPage Today, conducted at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwauke, demonstrated that people with early HIV infection initiating treatment right away did much better than those who waited to begin, based on present day treatment guidelines. Present day guidelines as to when to begin treatment are usually based on the T4 cell count. Traditional guidelines say that a T4 (CD4) count of 200 or below is when to start. As of a year and a half ago the Int

When to start HIV Treatment? New study suggests early isn’t better.

published: November, 07, 2011 Categories // Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Revolving Door, Treatment

Cohort Study: No AIDS-Free Survival Benefit to Starting HIV Treatment at CD4s of 500 or More

When to start HIV Treatment?  New study suggests early isn’t better.

  This article first appeared in unedited form in AIDSMeds October 11, 2011 Starting antiretroviral (ARV) therapy with a CD4 count above 500 doesn’t decrease the risk of AIDS or death from any cause—at least over an average follow-up period that approached five years—according to a new report from a large cohort study published in the September 26 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. For people living with HIV with CD4s below 350, the Concerted Action on SeroConversion to AIDS and

The World Health Organization delivers new HIV prevention and treatment guidelines

published: August, 24, 2011 Categories // As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Treatment

Devan Nambiar unravels the WHO’s latest global recommendations on services for MSM and transgendered people

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued comprehensive recommendations on the prevention and treatment of HIV and sexually transmitted infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgendered people. The guidance emphasizes the very high vulnerability of MSM and transgender people to HIV infection, even in settings where the majority of HIVinfections occur through sex between men and women. In the last 5 years we have seen an increase in HIV infections in MSM across Canada

New 2011 HIV Treatment Guidelines

published: January, 31, 2011 Categories // Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Treatment

Devan Nambiar looks at recent changes in standards of care for people living with HIV

The US Dept. of Health and Humans Services updated the HIV treatment guidelines in January 2011. The review and clinical updates is conducted twice a year as science understands more of the intricacies of HART and the immune health. What has changed? 1. The guidelines state that CD4 + cells /mm3 only need to be monitored every 6 to 12 months for most HIV positive persons who are successful on HART and does not have another concomitant illness. Concomitant illness such as kidney disease, liver

<<  15 16 17 18 19 [20