Research

The First Word

published: May, 28, 2012 Categories // Activism, Health, Research, Living with HIV

J from Singapore did some research on this: “If I asked you for the first word that comes to mind when I say HIV, what would it be?"

Over the past week or so I embarked on my own little experiment. I wanted to know, what does the everyday young person really think about HIV? There are many ways that this can be done, and I’m sure many have tried before, but I was interested in knowing the first thing from the top of their heads.. the image they would most associate with the virus. To achieve this, I couldn’t be posing anything too thought-provoking, because time to think is really time to audit our response and eventua

PrEP acceptable to UK gay men, studies find

published: April, 29, 2012 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Gay Men, Current Affairs, Research, Health, Sexual Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Population Specific

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) would be an acceptable HIV prevention strategy for large numbers of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men in major UK cities, according to two studies presented at a British HIV conference this week.

PrEP acceptable to UK gay men, studies find

This article by Roger Pebody first  appeared on aidsmap.  The First Study Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) would be an acceptable HIV prevention strategy for large numbers of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men in major UK cities, according to two studies presented to the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference in Birmingham this week. The conference also heard details of a small pilot PrEP study, likely to start recruiting later this year. A cross-sectional survey of 842

Putting the spotlight on OCS

published: April, 02, 2012 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Health, Research, Living with HIV, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy was an early enrolee in The Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study (OCS). Here he describes his experiences, the type of data that is collected, how that is being done and how it is being used to further our knowledge of HIV today.

Putting the spotlight on OCS

In my last column about HIV research I talked about how, as people living with HIV, research and researchers are both important and omnipresent.  We may just be the most studied population in the history of the earth. Back in the day, in fact, the black humour that has surfaced in our community from Day One used to say if we don’t die of AIDS we’ll be researched to death. In fact the irony of this is that it has been the fruits of research that have kept us alive, kicking and making fun

Research and Us

published: March, 26, 2012 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Health, Research, Living with HIV, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy talks about the relationship between community and researchers, and features researcher Trevor Hart, with a video from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network.

Research and Us

Ever think about this?  There aren’t many people living with HIV who don’t have a connection, or even multiple connections, with research. Many of us, for example, are the subjects of research. The massive Ontario Cohort Study (OCS)  that I will be writing about here shortly has enrolled 5,644 participants over the last five years, of which I am one, recruited in the early days. My clinical data, with my consent of course, forms part of their data base, as does everything from my smoki

Understanding Risk: A Conversation

published: March, 20, 2012 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // As Prevention , Features and Interviews, Health, Research, Sexual Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Sex and Sexuality , Bob Leahy - Publisher

Editor Bob Leahy interviews CATIE’s James Wilton about the tricky topic of communicating risk in the age of undetectable viral load

Understanding Risk: A Conversation

Bob Leahy: James, you gave a presentation at the Gay Men’s Sexual Health Summit in Toronto last week on Understanding and Communicating Risk: Viral Load and HIV Transmission. That’s a topic that fascinates us here, and one we’ve been following on PositiveLite.com for some time. Clearly it’s important for people living with HIV to have the best possible understanding of this too.  With this in mind, thank you for agreeing to talk to PositiveLite.com and helping us understand more. I g

Kevin Fenton talks Housing and Healthy Outcomes in New Orleans

published: December, 28, 2011 Written by // Ontario HIV Treatment Network - Research, Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // OHTN OHTN/PositiveLite.com, Conferences, Events, Features and Interviews, Research, Health, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Kevin Fenton is interviewed by Bob Leahy on housing and healthy outcomes and how Housing is HIV Prevention.

Kevin Fenton talks Housing and Healthy Outcomes in New Orleans

Kevin Fenton is Director, (US) National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.  Here he is interviewed by Bob Leahy on housing and healthy outcomes and how housing is HIV prevention.  The interview was filmed at the North American Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit  2011 in New Orleans. This video is part of a collaboration between the Ontario HIV Treatment Network (OHTN) and PositiveLite.com 

RX Coles Notes: Starting Treatment Early – emerging results

published: December, 16, 2011 Written by // Brian Finch - Founder Categories // Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Revolving Door, Treatment

People starting treatment early fared better in this study.

 RX Coles Notes: Starting Treatment Early – emerging results

A recent study, published in MedPage Today, conducted at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwauke, demonstrated that people with early HIV infection initiating treatment right away did much better than those who waited to begin, based on present day treatment guidelines. Present day guidelines as to when to begin treatment are usually based on the T4 cell count. Traditional guidelines say that a T4 (CD4) count of 200 or below is when to start. As of a year and a half ago the Int

Just the facts – the Lambda Study

published: November, 23, 2011 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Gay Men, Research, Health, Sexual Health, Population Specific , Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy reports on a large scale study of gay mens’ sexual health in two large Ontario cities, which delivers the numbers everybody wants to know.

Just the facts – the Lambda Study

Lambda kind of slipped under our radar when it was released this past April.  Perhaps while it’s all about sex, its less sexy than some out there.  But for hard facts about things like HIV incidence, who knows their status and who doesn’t, how often men are getting tested, how often they practice safer sex – the nuts and bolts on which informed HIV prevention discussions and campaigns are built on – this is the real deal. So this is interesting stuff, and also very useful. F

The mysterious path of HIV - from chimp to man and on to North America - is mysterious no longer

published: October, 25, 2011 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Features and Interviews, Research, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy interviews the author of The Origins of AIDS, an exciting new book which reveals every link in the previously not well understood chain that saw the HIV virus travel from the jungles of Africa to North America.

The mysterious path of HIV - from chimp to man and on to North America - is mysterious no longer

I think it was someone getting the word out on twitter that first alerted me to the fact there was a new book out called The Origins of AIDS. Not only, we heard, was it a well documented account of the most likely way in which the virus spread – the circuitous route from chimp to man to worldwide epidemic – but it was also a page turner. The New York Time had written a fascinating account of its thesis which sparked my interest further. So I contacted its author, Dr Jacques Pepin, who

Reliving our victories

published: September, 29, 2011 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Research, Health, Bob Leahy - Publisher

PositiveLite’s Brian Finch and Bob Leahy were both involved in the delivery of Ontario’s HIV Stigma.com campaign of 2008-9. Now the HIV prevention campaign’s findings have received international attention.

Reliving our victories

September 15, 2008 found me feeling rather lost and out of place in a dull-looking buidling, at least from the exterior, but which housed an impressively professional looking movie studio.  We were in an industrial area of East York (Toronto). I was there to film an interview for Top Drawer Creative, the ad agency GMSH (Gay Men’s Sexual Health Alliance) had engaged to produce the campaign for us. It was an intimidating set-up. Real lights, drapes, BIG cameras, sound

LATE BREAKER! ART at 350 -550 CD4 cuts disease rate 40%

published: July, 19, 2011 Categories // International AIDS Conference , Research, Brian Finch

LATE BREAKER! ART at 350 -550 CD4 cuts disease rate 40% in Randomized HPTN 052 Trail.

LATE BREAKER! ART at 350 -550 CD4 cuts disease rate 40%

ART at 350-550 CD4s Cuts Disease Rate 40% in Randomized HPTN 052 Trial 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, July 17-20, 2011, Rome Mark Mascolini Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a CD4 count of 350 to 550 rather than waiting for a count of 250 lowered the risk of serious complications, especially extrapulmonary tuberculosis, by 40% in the randomized HPTN 052 trial, conducted in 5 African countries, Brazil, India, Thailand, and the United States [1]. Earlier

IAS Rome 2011 - Starting Treatment - a discussion with Dr Steven Deeks

published: July, 19, 2011 Written by // Brian Finch - Founder Categories // International AIDS Conference , Events, Features and Interviews, Research, Treatment, Brian Finch

My first interview at the Rome IAS conference with Dr. Steven Deeks.

IAS Rome 2011 - Starting Treatment - a discussion with Dr Steven Deeks

My first days at the conference have been frustrating, and to be frank, there is not a lot of news coming out on the topic I'm interested in, and not really so much that would be interesting to the community.  Much of the information coming out I'm going to have to sift through once I am back home to properly analyse.  Thiere is much emphasis on treatment as prevention, hard core drug studies that are difficult to understand, and very few presentations that play to the needs of

DEBI does Montréal

published: March, 09, 2011 Categories // Gay Men, Research

Ken Monteith reports that AIDS Community Care Montreal (ACCM) has embarked on an innovative strategy to encourage HIV testing among gay men. It's called the ATOMc Project.

DEBI does Montréal

The ATOMcproject trains volunteers in techniques to recruit gay men from their social circles to encourage them to be tested, and the project is currently recruiting volunteers. (I’ll explain DEBI later on.) Allow me to let the project’s promotional video explain the project: (see first video below).  There is general recognition in the HIV movement that knowing one’s status is key to maintaining one’s own health and in raising awareness to prevent transmission to others. The prob

Dr. Curtis Cooper & Greg Robinson on HIV/Hep coinfection and liver transplants

published: May, 16, 2010 Written by // Brian Finch - Founder Categories // Community Events, Hep B and C, Events, Features and Interviews, Research, Brian Finch

I'm reposting as to be able to publish links on Facebook. June 14th, at the Coutyard Marriot, the Canadian Treatment Action Council held a presentation and panel discussion on the latest litterature review and analysis on liver transplants for those who are either HIV or Hep B/C positive, or both. For those who may not know, if one is HIV + they are not able to get a transplant in Canada, nor will any of the provinces pay to have it done in the states. This is the first in an ongoing series to

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