Research

Research finds that harm reduction and ART helped to reduce the spread of HIV in Vancouver

published: May, 02, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, Treatment, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

Sean R. Hosein of CATIE reports on research in Vancouver that attempted to study the relative impact that ART, harm reduction or both can have on the spread of HIV.

Research finds that harm reduction and ART helped to reduce the spread of HIV in Vancouver

In clinical trials, the early initiation of HIV treatment (ART) stabilizes the immune system and significantly reduces the risk of developing AIDS-related infections and cancers. This benefit of ART is so profound that researchers increasingly expect that many ART users will live into their senior years. Key to reaping the benefit of ART is achieving an undetectable level of HIV in the blood (viral load) and maintaining it through daily use of ART and regular checkups and laboratory monitori

Attending #HealtheVoices2017: a conference like no other.

published: April, 28, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Social Media, Activism, Mental Health, Research, International , Living with HIV, Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver reports back on attending HealtheVoices17, a conference of online health advocates held in Chicago by Janssen & Janssen.

Attending #HealtheVoices2017: a conference like no other.

I applied, but didn't expect to go. HealtheVoices is a very different sort of conference to any of the others I’ve been to. It’s a conference of online patient health advocates, 105 of them this time, representing different chronic health conditions, HIV being just one. I was already aware of the conference due to PositiveLite.com’s Wayne Bristow and Bob Leahy having attended last year. They’d both had nothing but good to say about the experience and so, thinking, “Why the heck not

About the Positive Plus One Research Study

published: April, 26, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Research, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Positive and negative, have both your voices heard. Take the 30-minute online or telephone survey and receive a thank you gift card.

About the Positive Plus One Research Study

As HIV rates have stabilized, HIV-positive individuals are living longer lives. More and more people today are in relationships where one of the two people has HIV – this is known as an HIV-serodiscordant relationship. Many diseases can bring stress to a relationship, but the impact of HIV is potentially unique. People in serodiscordant relationships may face many challenges, including stigma, accommodating new HIV technologies, and the risk of transmission between partners. We are a group

Black gay men still at higher risk of HIV in the UK

published: April, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Mental Health, Research, Health, International , Media, Population Specific , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody reports on a survey showing gay black men in the UK to also be at elevated risk of depression and suicidal thoughts.

Black gay men still at higher risk of HIV in the UK

Gay and bisexual men of black ethnicity are disproportionately likely to be living with diagnosed HIV than white British men, with no evidence that this health inequality has narrowed since 2001, according to a report published online ahead of print in Sexually Transmitted Infections. The data comes from the 2014 Gay Men’s Sex Survey, a convenience sample of 15,388 men recruited online. While 11.3% of white British men who had ever taken a test were diagnosed with HIV, this was the case

Attending CAHR2017 as a CATIE rapporteur

published: April, 13, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Aging, Social Media, Conferences, Activism, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Youth, Mental Health, Women, Research, Health, Legal, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver reports back on #CAHR2017

Attending CAHR2017 as a CATIE rapporteur

As I prepared to attend CAHR2017 in Montreal I was elated, but a bit nervous as well. I hadn’t qualified for a community scholarship but had been accepted as a CATIE rapporteur. This meant I’d be covering the event for CATIE as well as for PositiveLite.com and then on the final day, my fellow rapporteurs and I would present a report back to the rest of the conference with a distillation of what we’d seen and heard. So yes, I had butterflies, mostly because I haven’t done much science w

From the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2017; new drugs, new hope and possible timelines

published: April, 07, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Treatment, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on several new drugs that are in varying stages of development.

From the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2017;  new drugs, new hope and possible timelines

Une version française est disponible ici. At the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), which took place in Seattle from February 13 to 16, 2017, researchers presented data about new anti-HIV compounds in development, including the following: a new integrase inhibitor – bictegravir a new nuke (NRTI) – code-named GS-9131 a non-nuke (NNRTI) – doravirine a new protease inhibitor – code-named GS-PI1 a capsid inhibitor (a new cla

Investigating late HIV diagnoses as serious incidents may spur change across the health system.

published: April, 05, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Newly Diagnosed, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody on a report by public health officials and clinicians on a novel strategy to reduce very late HIV diagnosis in high-prevalence areas.

Investigating late HIV diagnoses as serious incidents may spur change across the health system.

Investigating cases of very late HIV diagnosis through the NHS’ serious incident reporting process allows identification of the reasons for late diagnosis and provides an impetus for initiatives to address them, public health officials and clinicians report in the March issue of the Journal of Public Health. In 2015 in the UK, 39% of adults were diagnosed with HIV infection at a late stage (below 350 CD4 cells/mm3) and 21% at a very late stage (below 200 CD4 cells/mm3). Late diagnosis of

Daily cannabis use has no negative Impact on HIV treatment

published: April, 04, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Alternative Therapies, Social Media, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From Culture Magazine, this report on the ACCESS study, which monitored cannabis use among HIV patients.

Daily cannabis use has no negative Impact on HIV treatment

This article previously appeared at Culture Magazine, here. Daily cannabis use has little or no impact on HIV clinical outcomes, according to new research. A study was published in The International Journal of Drug Policy which suggests that heavy cannabis use does not pose a threat to those who are on HIV medications. Data was derived from the ACCESS study, which monitored drug use among HIV patients. Between 2005 and 2015, 874 HIV positive patients in Vancouver, Canada were observed b

Legalisation of sex work associated with lower prevalence of HIV in sex workers

published: April, 03, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Women, Research, Health, Sexual Health, International , Legal, Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody reports on a study suggesting that legalization of some aspects of sex work might help reduce HIV prevalence in this high-risk group.

Legalisation of sex work associated with lower prevalence of HIV in sex workers

Countries that have legalized some aspects of sex work have fewer sex workers living with HIV than countries that criminalize all aspects of sex work, according to an ecological analysis of 27 European countries published online ahead of print in The Lancet HIV. The association remained statistically significant after adjustment for countries’ economic development, HIV prevalence, antiretroviral therapy coverage and proportion of sex workers who inject drugs. “Our findings suggest th

Q&A with Oghenowede Eyawo: research points to major shifts in mortality and causes of death among people living with HIV

published: March, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Women, Research, Health, Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Two recent studies by the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) point to what else has changed now that people living with HIV are expected to live much longer lives.

Q&A with Oghenowede Eyawo: research points to major shifts in mortality and causes of death among people living with HIV

People with HIV are now living longer, and are less likely to die from an AIDS-defining illness. What do we know about their health and quality of life today? People with HIV who are receiving combination antiretroviral drugs can now live full, long lives—increasingly comparable to those who are HIV-negative. Two recent studies by the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) point to what else has changed now that people living with HIV are expected to live much longer lives. One study

HIV’s milder cousin may be less mild than previously thought

published: March, 29, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Conferences, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Gus Cairns: Seventy per cent of people with HIV-2 progress to AIDS within 20 years

HIV’s milder cousin may be less mild than previously thought

HIV-2’s virulence may have been underestimated and although progression to AIDS  and death in HIV-2 infection was slower than with HIV-1, it was the rule rather than the exception, new research from West Africa presented at last month's Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) indicates. HIV-2 crossed over into human beings from the sooty mangabey monkey, rather than from chimpanzees and gorillas like HIV-1. Its entry into humans probably precedes that of HIV

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

published: March, 22, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Social Media, Conferences, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Women, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Liz Highleyman reports on several studies looking into the efffects of HIV on brain function.

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains a poorly-understood co-morbidity in HIV-positive people. Wh

Is HIV stigma killing us?

published: March, 21, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Social Media, Aging, Mental Health, Research, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver investigates “Stigma and suicide among gay and bisexual men living with HIV”, a study by Olivier Ferlatte, Travis Salway, John L. Oliffe & Terry Trussler and finds the answer to be an unequivocal "yes."

Is HIV stigma killing us?

“People get what they deserve, Time is round and space is curved, Honey have you got the nerve  to be Queen Elvis?” – Robyn Hitchcock, “Queen Elvis” Once I was diagnosed in 2014 I knew right away that I wanted to advocate so I’ve been out about my HIV-positive status from the get-go. I objected to living a lie, which I equate with living in an ongoing state of fear. It didn’t take me long to realize that HIV is a minority disease, that my fellow human beings were potentiall

One in five ‘heterosexual’ men in the UK caught their HIV from another man.

published: March, 10, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap.com, Gus Cairns reports on new data presented by Manon Ragonnet-Cronin and colleagues from Edinburgh University at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week.

One in five ‘heterosexual’ men in the UK caught their HIV from another man.

A genetic analysis of a large database of people with HIV in the UK in care shows that 18% of men with HIV who claim to be exclusively heterosexual in fact belong to clusters of linked infections that consist only of men. This provides a minimum figure for the proportion of men with HIV in the UK who are what the researchers call “undisclosed men who have sex with men (MSM)”. It is a minimum figure because other men who caught HIV through sex with another man may be in mixed-gender cluste

HIV prevention for people who inject drugs: New biomedical approaches and time-honoured strategies

published: March, 06, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Lifestyle

From CATIE, Camille Arkell looks at the risk of HIV transmission through injection drug use, and explores some of the factors that contribute to an increased risk among people who inject drugs.

HIV prevention for people who inject drugs: New biomedical approaches and time-honoured strategies

Une version française est disponible ici. In Canada, people who inject drugs are disproportionately affected by HIV compared to the general population. Among people who inject drugs, HIV transmission happens primarily through the sharing of injection drug use equipment, but also through sexual transmission. This article will look at the risk of HIV transmission through injection drug use, and will explore some of the factors that contribute to an increased risk among people who inject dr

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