Research

Syphilis cases on the rise among HIV-positive people in Calgary

published: March, 27, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, CATIE, Health, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Sexual Health, Media

"The Calgary study underscores the need for regular, perhaps even frequent, screening for syphilis among sexually active HIV-positive people." From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports.

Syphilis cases on the rise among HIV-positive people in Calgary

- Calgary doctors noticed a three-fold increase in syphilis among patients with HIV - Syphilis was more common among people with HIV not taking treatment - More than half of cases had no symptoms, highlighting the need for screening Syphilis cases decreased in the 1990s but began to increase in Canada and other high-income countries around the year 2000. This increase has disproportionally affected gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM), including those who are HIV positive

Social determinants of health linked to HIV mortality rates

published: March, 27, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, General Health, Mental Health, Health, Research, Sexual Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

People with HIV in Ontario still dying at higher rates than the general population.

Social determinants of health linked to HIV mortality rates

 Courtesy of St. Michael's Hospital Dr. Sean Rourke, a neuropsychologist at St. Michael's Hospital and scientist at its Centre for Urban Health Solutions,  TORONTO, March 19, 2018 -- People who are living with HIV in Ontario have access to good health care and medications, yet they are still dying younger and at substantially higher rates than the rest of the population, according to a new study published today. The findings suggest that the overall well-being of these people is being neg

Syphilis cases on the rise among HIV-positive people in Calgary

published: March, 25, 2018 Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, CATIE, Health, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Sexual Health, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports

- Calgary doctors noticed a three-fold increase in syphilis among patients with HIV - Syphilis was more common among people with HIV not taking treatment - More than half of cases had no symptoms, highlighting the need for screening Syphilis cases decreased in the 1990s but began to increase in Canada and other high-income countries around the year 2000. This increase has disproportionally affected gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM), including those who are HIV positive

HIV doesn’t define a parent’s power to love

published: March, 14, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, Mental Health, Research, International , Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Media, Guest Authors, Opinion Pieces

People living with HIV often feel cut off from society and judged by their decision to become parents. From FS Magazine, Mark Mesiti reports on an initiative to help end the stigma.

HIV doesn’t define a parent’s power to love

Photo © Shutterstock.com / WaveBreakMedia Despite significant medical advances, increased awareness and the ability to live a full life with HIV, a social stigma still exists around people with HIV having a family. This stigma does not just affect the LGBT community; it is very much a mainstream issue. Does a stigma exist? With almost 50% of HIV-positive respondents in a recent European study commissioned by Gilead Sciences stating that they felt having HIV would be a barrier to them ha

Beyond stigma: challenging STBBI stigma in the classroom

published: March, 13, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, Youth, Mental Health, Health, Research, Sexual Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Media

From CATIE blog, Brittany Neron and Makeda Zook blog about "Beyond the Basics", a sex ed curriculum companion resource that doesn't use fear- and risk-based messaging

Beyond stigma: challenging STBBI stigma in the classroom

Sex education is a largely stigmatized and often politically volatile subject, even though access to comprehensive sexuality education is enshrined in international law as a human right. The standard of sex ed that is taught across Canada is uneven, and even when it is scientifically accurate, it is often delivered in a risk- and fear-based way, particularly when it comes to teaching young people about safer sex and sexual transmitted and blood borne infections (STBBIs). Fear- and risk-base

Patterns of substance use associated with fentanyl exposure in Vancouver

published: March, 12, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, Current Affairs, Health, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on a Vancouver study aiming to find out about the degree of exposure to fentanyl among people who use street drugs.

Patterns of substance use associated with fentanyl exposure in Vancouver

- British Columbia researchers analyzed urine samples of 669 people who used street drugs - 15% of all participants had been exposed to the extremely powerful opioid fentanyl - Exposure to fentanyl was higher among those who inject drugs In the past several years, deaths from opioid overdose have increased in Canada and the U.S. In Canada the increase in deaths was initially reported in British Columbia and then spread to neighbouring Alberta and other parts of Canada. British

How much "PrEP-resistant" HIV is out there?

published: March, 12, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, International AIDS Conference , As Prevention , Gay Men, Conferences, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Gus Cairns reports from the recent 25th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2018).

How much

A study presented at the recent 25th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2018) aims to quantify how many people with HIV there might be in the community who both have a detectable HIV viral load and also have significant resistance to tenofovir and emtricitabine, the two drugs currently used in pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). The researchers, from the University of Washington in Seattle, found that in King County, which contains Seattle, no more than 0.3% of the l

Experimental antibody plus TLR7 agonist maintains viral suppression in monkeys

published: March, 07, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Social Media, As Prevention , Conferences, Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

Five of eleven treated animals still remained virally suppressed at six months. From AIDSmap, Liz Highleyman reports.

Experimental antibody plus TLR7 agonist maintains viral suppression in monkeys

Dan Barouch presenting at CROI 2018. Photo by Liz Highleyman Treatment with a broadly neutralising antibody plus an immune-stimulating drug led to long-term viral remission after interrupting antiretroviral therapy in a monkey study, according to data presented at the 25th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2018) this week in Boston. Monkeys that received both the antibody, known as PGT121, and the TLR7 agonist GS-9620 maintained an undetectable viral load withou

US studies underline importance of primary care physicians for people with HIV

published: March, 05, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Health, Research, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Keith Alcorn reports on two studies assessing the influence of provider type on outcomes of chronic co-morbidities in HIV.

US studies underline importance of primary care physicians for people with HIV

People with HIV who have other medical conditions such as high blood pressure or high lipids appear to do better if they have a primary care physician as well as an HIV physician, according to a study of people receiving care through UCLA Center for Clinical AIDS Research and Education, researchers report in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. A second study, looking at chronic medical conditions, or co-morbidities, in a large sample of people with HIV in the United States found that high b

Researchers study the impact of co-infection with hepatitis viruses on pregnant women with HIV

published: March, 01, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, Hep B and C, CATIE, Women, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Media, Population Specific

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on a study designed to find out more about the impact of these viruses on pregnancy and birth outcomes in co-infected women.

Researchers study the impact of co-infection with hepatitis viruses on pregnant women with HIV

- Hepatitis C co-infection increases risk of pregnancy complications for women with HIV - Women co-infected with hepatitis C had higher HIV viral loads when giving birth - Researchers suggest screening women with HIV for hepatitis C before pregnancy Due to shared routes of infection, co-infection with hepatitis-causing viruses, particularly hepatitis B-virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV), is relatively common among some people with HIV. To find out more about the impact of these viru

Chronic depression leads to poorer engagement with key stages of HIV care continuum, say US researchers

published: February, 28, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Mental Health, Health, Research, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on a study designed to examine the association between chronic depression and clinical outcomes.

Chronic depression leads to poorer engagement with key stages of HIV care continuum, say US researchers

Increased time spent living with depression is associated with poorer engagement with the HIV care continuum, investigators from the United States report in JAMA Psychiatry. Chronic depression was associated with missing appointments, a detectable viral load and an increased mortality risk. “We found that a greater proportion of time spent with depression increased the risk of missed primary care appointments and lack of viral suppression in a dose-response manner,” comment the autho

Age 60 or over and living with HIV? Have your say!

published: February, 20, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Aging, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Events, Women, Upcoming Events, Research, Health, Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors

Championing Healthy Public Policy for Older Adults Living with HIV in Canada.

Age 60 or over and living with HIV? Have your say!

Please consider joining Realize for one of three upcoming online consultations on Championing Healthy Public Policy for Older Adults Living with HIV in Canada.  These online consultations are open to people living with HIV, service providers, health professionals, researchers, policy makers and others with a shared interest in these issues. Please consider joining Realize for one of three upcoming online consultations on Championing Healthy Public Policy for Older Adults Living with

Will de-simplification of HIV treatment become common in high-income countries?

published: February, 14, 2018 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on a study exploring de-simplification as a cost-cutting measure.

Will de-simplification of HIV treatment become common in high-income countries?

- As more people start HIV treatment, researchers are exploring ways to cut costs - Single tablets can be replaced by a few pills comprising cheaper generic drugs - Alberta clinic projects $4.3 million saved by “de-simplifying” one treatment regimen Initiating and staying on HIV treatment (ART) results in most people having very low levels of HIV in their blood. Such low levels are commonly called undetectable and result in improved measures of health and projections of near-normal life

High prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive patients in the US with 'missed opportunities' for its diagnosis and control

published: February, 14, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Mental Health, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Media, Guest Authors

“We found that about 1 in 8 patients has undiagnosed and untreated hypertension,” write the researchers. From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

High prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive patients in the US with 'missed opportunities' for its diagnosis and control

  There is a high prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive patients in the United States and many of these individuals are not receiving hypertensive therapy, investigators report in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Overall, 42% of patients were classified as hypertensive and 13% of these patients were undiagnosed with a further 26% with uncontrolled high blood pressure despite therapy. “We found that about 1 in 8 patients has undiagnosed and untreated hypertension,” write the researc

Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longer

published: February, 12, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Alternative Therapies, Aging, Social Media, Mental Health, Research, Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longer

A chemical found in marijuana, known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, has been found to potentially slow the process in which mental decline can occur in up to 50 percent of HIV patients, says a new Michigan State University study. “It’s believed that cognitive function decreases in many of those with HIV partly due to chronic inflammation that occurs in the brain,” said Norbert Kaminski, lead author of the study, now published in the journal AIDS. “This happens because the immune sys

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