African, Caribbean and Black

Attending CAHR2017 as a CATIE rapporteur

published: April, 13, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Aging, Social Media, Activism, Conferences, As Prevention , African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Youth, Mental Health, Women, Research, Health, Treatment, Legal, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver reports back on #CAHR2017

Attending CAHR2017 as a CATIE rapporteur

As I prepared to attend CAHR2017 in Montreal I was elated, but a bit nervous as well. I hadn’t qualified for a community scholarship but had been accepted as a CATIE rapporteur. This meant I’d be covering the event for CATIE as well as for PositiveLite.com and then on the final day, my fellow rapporteurs and I would present a report back to the rest of the conference with a distillation of what we’d seen and heard. So yes, I had butterflies, mostly because I haven’t done much science w

The capsid inhibitor—a new class to enter clinical trials

published: April, 13, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Gay Men, CATIE, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Women, Health, Sexual Health, International , Treatment, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

From CATIE: "This finding suggests that the capsid inhibitor has potential for intermittent dosing in people—perhaps every one or two months."

The capsid inhibitor—a new class to enter clinical trials

Most approved anti-HIV drugs work by interfering with an enzyme and/or protein that is needed by HIV-infected cells to make new viruses. A journey through the cell The capsid is the name given to the proteins that surround HIV’s genetic material. Upon HIV attaching itself to a target cell of the immune system, the virus sends its genetic material (RNA) into the cell. As the genetic material is surrounded by the capsid, it is protected from detection by the cell’s internal sensors. The ca

Investigating late HIV diagnoses as serious incidents may spur change across the health system.

published: April, 05, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Newly Diagnosed, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody on a report by public health officials and clinicians on a novel strategy to reduce very late HIV diagnosis in high-prevalence areas.

Investigating late HIV diagnoses as serious incidents may spur change across the health system.

Investigating cases of very late HIV diagnosis through the NHS’ serious incident reporting process allows identification of the reasons for late diagnosis and provides an impetus for initiatives to address them, public health officials and clinicians report in the March issue of the Journal of Public Health. In 2015 in the UK, 39% of adults were diagnosed with HIV infection at a late stage (below 350 CD4 cells/mm3) and 21% at a very late stage (below 200 CD4 cells/mm3). Late diagnosis of

HIV diagnosis in Nairobi, Kenya, a personal account.

published: April, 03, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Kimutai Kemboi, International , Living with HIV, Media

Kimutai Kemboi shares the story of his HIV journey, from diagnosis up to now.

HIV diagnosis in Nairobi, Kenya, a personal account.

It was in November 2015, a day which will remain memorable in my life as long as I am on this earth. At around 11am, as I stepped out of a friend's house, heading to where I was staying, I heard loud music coming out from a big roadshow truck next to the stage where I was to board a matatu. I had to retreat for a while to see what the soothing music was all about.  As the truck approached, the music sounded louder and louder as the Dj did the mixes from one song to another. I was obsessed to

Q&A with Oghenowede Eyawo: research points to major shifts in mortality and causes of death among people living with HIV

published: March, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Women, Research, Health, Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Two recent studies by the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) point to what else has changed now that people living with HIV are expected to live much longer lives.

Q&A with Oghenowede Eyawo: research points to major shifts in mortality and causes of death among people living with HIV

People with HIV are now living longer, and are less likely to die from an AIDS-defining illness. What do we know about their health and quality of life today? People with HIV who are receiving combination antiretroviral drugs can now live full, long lives—increasingly comparable to those who are HIV-negative. Two recent studies by the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) point to what else has changed now that people living with HIV are expected to live much longer lives. One study

HIV: prosecution or prevention? HIV is not a crime

published: March, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Youth, Women, International , Legal, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From POZ, an excerpt from Sean Strub's book, The War on Sex, edited by David M. Halperin and Trevor Hoppe.

HIV: prosecution or prevention? HIV is not a crime

This excerpt from Sean Strub's book, The War on Sex previously appeared at POZ, here. Iowan Nick Rhoades is HIV-positive and has had an undetectable viral load for many years, making it virtually impossible for him to sexually transmit the virus. When he had sex with a man he met online in 2008, he also used a condom. Despite these protective measures, Rhoades was prosecuted and convicted for not disclosing his HIV status to his partner before they had sex. He was sentenced to 25 years i

HIV’s milder cousin may be less mild than previously thought

published: March, 29, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Conferences, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Gus Cairns: Seventy per cent of people with HIV-2 progress to AIDS within 20 years

HIV’s milder cousin may be less mild than previously thought

HIV-2’s virulence may have been underestimated and although progression to AIDS  and death in HIV-2 infection was slower than with HIV-1, it was the rule rather than the exception, new research from West Africa presented at last month's Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) indicates. HIV-2 crossed over into human beings from the sooty mangabey monkey, rather than from chimpanzees and gorillas like HIV-1. Its entry into humans probably precedes that of HIV

Where is the vision for HIV community leadership in tumultuous times?

published: March, 24, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, Gay Men, International , Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From TheBody.com, Andrew Spieldenner, Ph.D.: " I am a gay man of color openly living with HIV, and I no longer see a place for my kind of leadership in HIV agencies."

Where is the vision for HIV community leadership in tumultuous times?

We are in tumultuous times. Just a few years ago, President Obama and Secretary of State Clinton were talking the "end of AIDS" and a few governors even advanced plans to address that lofty goal. Today, we wonder whether at the end of this year we still will have access to the health care we need as people living with HIV. Our representative organizations are largely silent, tense, waiting to see what will happen.  For decades, non-profit organizations were a loud voice in politics and advoc

The importance of staying busy

published: March, 23, 2017 Written by // Louis "Kengi" Carr - L.A. Correspondent Categories // Aging, Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, Gay Men, Mental Health, Photography, Pets, International , Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Louis "Kengi" Carr

Our L.A. correspondent Kengi deals with bereavement and stress by keeping busy - and does some great work in the process.

The importance of staying busy

I’m sitting down to write this post, because on those rare occasions when escaping with my camera for a photography excursion doesn’t seem to work, I then try to relax, calm and center myself by writing. As a backup, I have my candle burning, I really love a nicely scented candle. Damn, if I had some sage this would be perfect. I’m sipping my hot tea and my little Daisy has pulled her blanket off the sofa, placing it right next to my work space. She’s the dog that loves to be close to

One in five ‘heterosexual’ men in the UK caught their HIV from another man.

published: March, 10, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap.com, Gus Cairns reports on new data presented by Manon Ragonnet-Cronin and colleagues from Edinburgh University at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week.

One in five ‘heterosexual’ men in the UK caught their HIV from another man.

A genetic analysis of a large database of people with HIV in the UK in care shows that 18% of men with HIV who claim to be exclusively heterosexual in fact belong to clusters of linked infections that consist only of men. This provides a minimum figure for the proportion of men with HIV in the UK who are what the researchers call “undisclosed men who have sex with men (MSM)”. It is a minimum figure because other men who caught HIV through sex with another man may be in mixed-gender cluste

Better depression care could improve outcomes for HIV treatment programmes

published: March, 02, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Mental Health, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

For AIDSmap.com, Roger Pebody reports from the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle.

Better depression care could improve outcomes for HIV treatment programmes

Improved management of depression and other mental health disorders has the potential to improve the outcomes of HIV treatment programmes, Pamela Collins of the National Institute of Mental Health told the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle last week. Mental health treatment should be integrated into HIV services in resource-limited settings, she said. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers, lung disease and other non-communicable diseases ha

Views from the front lines: PrEP in Canada

published: March, 01, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , CATIE, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Treatment, Media, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

CATIE spoke to three service providers about PrEP and finds very different conditions in different regions, but a common need for PrEP access.

Views from the front lines: PrEP in Canada

We spoke to three service providers to find their views and insights on how they talk to their clients about PrEP: Holly Taylor, Women's HIV/AIDS Community Development Coordinator, Regional HIV/AIDS Connection, London, Ontario Brook Biggin, Community Education Facilitator, HIV Edmonton; Founder, Edmonton Men’s Health Collective, Edmonton, Alberta Jessica Quijano, Travailleuse de rue, RÉZO, Montreal, Quebec Holly Taylor Are the communities or clients that you work with a

Like the Mark of Cain, we carry stigma with us.

published: March, 01, 2017 Written by // Michael Yoder Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Youth, Newly Diagnosed, Mental Health, Women, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Michael Yoder

Michael Yoder: "... I wonder if, in some ways, we perpetuate stigma by trying to diminish it."

Like the Mark of Cain, we carry stigma with us.

"Then the Lord put a mark on Cain so that no one who found him would kill him" Genesis 4:15-16 I see a lot of campaigns about reducing stigma and each time I see a new one there's a little knot in my stomach that makes me uncomfortable. While I strongly believe that we need to reduce HIV stigma and discrimination, I wonder if, in some ways, we perpetuate stigma by trying to diminish it. Here some people's heads will be exploding, but nonetheless, every time we talk about how we're stigmatiz

Trump seems to support Bush’s AIDS program for now... but will it be hobbled by his other policies?

published: February, 27, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Women, International , Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

As of 2016, the program helped provide life-saving antiretroviral treatment for over 11.5 million people, trained 220,000 health-care workers, and facilitated counseling and testing for over 74.3 million people. For The Atlantic, Joseph Frankel reports.

Trump seems to support Bush’s AIDS program for now... but will it be hobbled by his other policies?

To read the complete article by Joseph Frankel, visit The Atlantic, here. Despite concerns raised during the presidential transition, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) seems poised to continue its work. The multi-billion dollar government initiative created by George W. Bush in 2003 has worked with remarkable success to treat and prevent HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis in a number of countries around the world, and is often hailed as his greatest legacy. The

Should gays defend Milo? No.

published: February, 22, 2017 Written by // Michael Bouldin Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Arts and Entertainment, Performances, Women, International , Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Michael Bouldin

Michael Bouldin on Milo: "... sexist, transphobic, racist, pick what you wish from the long catalogue of human cruelties, he will likely embrace it this very instant, already has, or will at some future time of greater convenience."

Should gays defend Milo? No.

The question arises – I suppose – whether Milo should be able to rely on the good offices of Gay, Inc℠ or of the broader velvet mafia in media and culture. We do tend to defend our own, even if only for the reason that they are indeed our own. Do we, more specifically gay white men, do so for conservatives as reliably as for liberals? I propose that this is the wrong question to ask. My guess would be that Milo won’t be afforded the warm embrace of Ellen or Anderson Cooper, let al

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