African, Caribbean and Black

HIV cure research: slow going at AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa

published: August, 08, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, International AIDS Conference , Social Media, Gay Men, Conferences, Youth, Current Affairs, Newly Diagnosed, Women, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Guest Author Robert Reinhard gives a first-hand account of the highlights of AIDS2016 and the HIV Cure Symposium.

HIV cure research: slow going at AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa

I attended the recent IAS Durban Conference and the preceding two-day HIV Cure symposium hoping to learn of significant advances in the search for interventions that could place HIV infection into remission with durable immune system control of virus without the need for lifetime antitretroviral therapy (ART). That’s one working definition, among several, of what HIV cure might mean for the 37 million people who currently have HIV. My appetite for progress was not substantially rewarded al

Progress towards 90-90-90 targets is promising, but funding is the critical step, says UNAIDS leader

published: August, 04, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Gay Men, Women, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Keith Alcorn reports on the UN 90-90-90 Target Workshop at AIDS2016. With donor retreat rising and a widening gap between diagnosis and treatment in many countries, how can the 90-90-90 targets be met?

Progress towards 90-90-90 targets is promising, but funding is the critical step, says UNAIDS leader

The 90-90-90 targets for testing, treatment and viral suppression are achievable by 2020 in many high-burden countries, but donor retreat is now the biggest threat to widespread success, delegates at the UN 90-90-90 Target Workshop ahead of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016)in Durban agreed yesterday. The 90-90-90 target – 90% of people with HIV diagnosed, 90% of diagnosed people on treatment and 90% of treated people with fully suppressed viral load by 2020 – is intend

World’s largest study of HIV self-testing gets off the ground

published: July, 29, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, International AIDS Conference , General Health, Health, Research, International , Sexual Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody reports on the STAR Research Project, a study of the many concerns related to HIV self-testing kits.

World’s largest study of HIV self-testing gets off the ground

Early data from STAR, the largest study yet of HIV self-testing, suggests that there is a strong demand for self-testing in rural Zimbabwe, the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) heard this week. Other studies examined whether self-testing kits can help the male partners of pregnant women to test and whether such use might sometimes be coercive. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines HIV self-testing as “a process in which an individual who wants to know his or her HIV st

New strategy aims to end AIDS in children by 2020

published: July, 28, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, International AIDS Conference , Conferences, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From aidsmap's coverage of AIDS2016, Keith Alcorn reports on a new initiative to ensure that children and adolescents do not get left behind as treatment programs strive to achieve the 90-90-90 targets

New strategy aims to end AIDS in children by 2020

A new strategy to end paediatric AIDS launched at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban, South Africa, last Tuesday calls for antiretroviral treatment services to reach 1.6 million children and 1.2 million adolescents by 2018. The Super-Fast Track strategy is intended to close the gap between adult and paediatric treatment access, says UNAIDS, and will pull together the actions of numerous agencies. The strategy is intended to ensure that children and adolescents

HIV criminalization on the rise, especially in sub-Saharan Africa

published: July, 27, 2016 Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Gay Men, Current Affairs, International , Legal, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From aidsmap, Lesley Odendal reports on the state of HIV criminalization in 101 jurisdictions.

HIV criminalization on the rise, especially in sub-Saharan Africa

Globally, 72 countries have adopted laws that specifically allow for HIV criminalization, either because the law is specific to HIV, or because it names HIV as one (or more) of the diseases covered by a broader law. This total increases to 101 jurisdictions when the HIV criminalization laws in 30 of the states that make up the United States are counted individually. Prosecutions for HIV non-disclosure, potential or perceived exposure and/or unintentional transmission have now been reported in

Young women treated in very early HIV infection stay HIV negative and preserve immune function

published: July, 26, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, International AIDS Conference , Social Media, Conferences, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Women, Research, Health, International , Sexual Health, Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From aidsmap, Gus Cairns reports on the Fresh Study.

Young women treated in very early HIV infection stay HIV negative and preserve immune function

This article by Gus Cairns previously appeared at aidsmap here. A group of young South African women who were diagnosed in very early infection and immediately given antiretroviral therapy (ART) preserved their CD4 counts and the function of cells that HIV normally disrupts. And the majority of them never seroconverted, staying HIV-negative despite having evidence of low levels of HIV infection in cells. It is planned to follow these young women for two to three years, at which point a jud

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: no pants, no problem at the Global Village

published: July, 23, 2016 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, International AIDS Conference , Gay Men, Conferences, Current Affairs, Youth, Events, General Health, Women, Health, Research, International , Living with HIV, Mark S. King

The final installment of Mark S. King's video coverage of AIDS2016: HIV advocates from around the world and dancing with no pants.

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: no pants, no problem at the Global Village

The International AIDS Conference (AIDS2016) has been inspiring to say the least, but it's also hard work. What better way to unwind than the No Pants No Problem Dance Party, organized by Canada's Jessica Whitbread. Next, for this final installment of Mark's video coverage from AIDS2016 Mark speaks with teenage HIV advocates, grandmothers who care for children orphaned by HIV and a sexually explicit HIV prevention campaign. He also speaks with a team from Amsterdam, Netherlands, where the ne

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: of wrongful charges, sex trade advocacy and cruising the conference.

published: July, 21, 2016 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, International AIDS Conference , Activism, Conferences, Gay Men, Youth, Current Affairs, General Health, Events, Newly Diagnosed, Women, Health, International , Sexual Health, Legal, Mark S. King

Day three: Mark S. King speaks with former Lt. Col. Kenneth Pinkela, a sex trade education advocate, a London PrEP advocate, and later learns that the gay cruising apps are working hard at this conference.

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: of wrongful charges, sex trade advocacy and cruising the conference.

On day three of Marks video coverage of AIDS 2016 we find him chatting with former U. S. Army Colonel Ken Pinkela, who was dismissed from military service and sentenced to 11 months of military confinement after being wrongfully accused of not disclosing his HIV status to a sex partner. We also hear from Rosemary Namiburu, a nurse wrongfully imprisoned for HIV exposure via a needle and jailed for months. Mark also chats with Elizabeth Taylor's HIV activist grandchildren, Ayanda Denge of the S

Adopting a child when you are HIV-positive: when things go wrong

published: July, 20, 2016 Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Women, International , Lifestyle, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

Dear Donna Gold. Stigmatized for HIV while trying to adopt a child, Lolo writes a letter that recounts the long term damage.

Adopting a child when you are HIV-positive: when things go wrong

Toronto, July, 2016 Dear Donna Gold, I have wanted to write you a letter for some years. I wonder how things would have turned out differently for my husband and I had I put pen to paper before today. I have wanted to tell this story for some time. I feel compelled do so in the hopes that people with HIV and others will contemplate the issues I explore and the implications of these issues. Almost ten years ago, you were the Canadian-based social worker assigned to assess our family for suit

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: demanding treatment rights for all.

published: July, 20, 2016 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, International AIDS Conference , Gay Men, Conferences, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Youth, General Health, Newly Diagnosed, Women, International , Sexual Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Mark S. King

Day two: The AIDS2016 Treatment Access March

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: demanding treatment rights for all.

Amid all the “end of HIV” rhetoric, 13 of 14 UNAIDS member countries have decreased their HIV funding and 20 million people who need it have no access to treatment. Day two of Mark S. King's video coverage of AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa sees him joining the AIDS2016 Treatment Access March and chatting with advocates about why they've come. PositiveLite will be posting Mark's video coverage each day of the conference. This video previously appeared on TheBodypro.com here.

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: gay HIV advocates speak out

published: July, 19, 2016 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, Social Media, International AIDS Conference , As Prevention , Gay Men, Conferences, Current Affairs, Youth, Newly Diagnosed, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, International , Sexual Health, Legal, Living with HIV, Sex and Sexuality , Mark S. King

Mark S. King chats with gay HIV advocates from around the world about criminalization, chem sex and PrEP

Mark S. King from #AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa: gay HIV advocates speak out

Mark S. King is in Durban, South Africa for #AIDS2016 and his video coverage begins today. In this first installment it seems remarkable, with such draconian laws in place in their home countries that so many gay men have the courage to even show up. Mark speaks with gay HIV advocates from around the world about what life is like for them back home and the ongoing criminalization of homosexuality in 75 countries. He also chats with them about PrEP, the difficulty of obtaining PrEP in some cou

Durban Diary – Day six

published: July, 19, 2016 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Community Events, African, Caribbean and Black, International AIDS Conference , Health, International , Treatment, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Behind the eight-ball. Our editor Bob Leahy is in Durban, South Africa this week, filing daily reports from the International AIDS Conference. Day six finds him so busy all he had time to send us was pictures. He promises more tomorrow.

Durban Diary – Day six

What an amazing day, so full of inspiring moments, photo ops, wonderful quotes, local colour and passions shared.  Will tell you about them sooner or later but they say a picture says a thousand words – or something - so here are about 10,000 words.  I will say  briefly that today was about touring the Global Village (and I have lots of pics and video of that), going on the massive Treatment March through the streets of downtown Durban) lots from that too), a reception for the Canadian

Gilead’s new price hikes on HIV drugs anger AIDS activists

published: July, 15, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Youth, Newly Diagnosed, Women, Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Gilead hikes price of HIV therapies, other drugs by up to 10 percent

Gilead’s new price hikes on HIV drugs anger AIDS activists

This article by Ed Silverman @Pharmalot previously appeared on the Stat website, where you can read the whole story. As part of a strategy to switch patients to newer HIV treatments, Gilead Sciences late last week raised prices on a pair of older HIV medications that face patent expiration. This sort of maneuver is often found in the pharmaceutical playbook, but is triggering still more criticism by AIDS activists of its overall pricing strategies. Here’s what Gilead did: the company

The first Toronto Pride was a riot.

published: July, 11, 2016 Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Community Events, Activism, Pride, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Events, Media, Opinion Pieces, Jason Cole

Jason R. Cole on why the Black Lives Matter sit-in at this year's Pride parade was completely appropriate.

The first Toronto Pride was a riot.

Toronto Pride 2016 photos by Bob Leahy It’s a popular meme that floats around during the month of June annually, as if to remind us all of our roots. The assumption is, of course, that we need reminding. The circumstances of this past week would certainly indicate that some of us do. During the annual Pride Parade in Toronto, the activist group Black Lives Matter staged a sit-­in that lasted 30 minutes. The group chanted ‘pride is political’, refusing to let up until Mathieu Chante

Why is tackling stigma so difficult?

published: July, 08, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Gay Men, Youth, Newly Diagnosed, Mental Health, Women, International , Legal, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media, Opinion Pieces, Sex and Sexuality

From the U. K., the National Aids Trust details the multiple challenges we face in ending stigma.

Why is tackling stigma so difficult?

This article previously appeared on the National AIDS Trust website here. For many in HIV advocacy addressing stigma is the Holy Grail. Many, if not all, of the factors that drive the HIV epidemic are embroiled with stigma.  The impact it has on the lives of people living with HIV is well documented.  In a recent survey of over half of people living with HIV reported feelings of shame, guilt, low self-esteem and self-blame; one in five had experienced verbal harassment or threats.1 Stigma

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