Activism

Meeting Nina

published: November, 07, 2012 Written by // Louis "Kengi" Carr - L.A. Correspondent Categories // Activism, International , Living with HIV, Louis "Kengi" Carr

Kengi: "Nina is unlike any leader I’ve ever met.....she is brilliant, very accomplished and has an unmatched record of compassion and great care as well as a commitment to healthcare and HIV services for populations hardest hit by HIV and AIDS."

Meeting Nina

I’ve been very busy lately with photographing various HIV events here in Los Angeles. This is how I had the pleasure of meeting Nina Harawa. She was one of the guests in attendance at the Leadership Awards put on by the Los Angeles Women’s HIV Task Force which I wrote about recently. She is also the reason I was able to photograph and video the Breaking the Silence event in Los Angeles. I know you’re wondering what is Breaking the Silence and let me start by saying, no I did not complet

The future/now for queer/trans* health

published: July, 17, 2013 Categories // Activism, Youth, Health, Sexual Health, Population Specific

Robert Birch goes to British Columbia’s CampOUT!, a program of workshops and activities in a camp setting for queer and trans youth to discover their community, themselves and their health needs

The future/now for queer/trans* health

 “I’ve gone from being the butt of everyone’s jokes to being everyone’s friend until proven otherwise.”  This gentle fifteen-year-old trans* youth needs allies but lives in a culture of bullies. As a middle aged cisgender gay man who has survived his bullies, I continue to learn how to become a more effective ally. On a small west coast gulf island during the Canada Day weekend a new world opened up for 58 queer and trans* youth and two young straight identified allies. Thirty on-

Seventeen years from the edge of the abyss

published: August, 12, 2013 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors

David Hoe was diagnosed with HIV in 1988. He was within days of death in 1996 when new drugs pulled him back from the brink. Now 70, Hoe is alive to tell the tale to a new generation that has lost the fear factor.

Seventeen years from the edge of the abyss

Photograph by: Jean Levac , Ottawa Citizen By Joanne Laucius, From  OTTAWA CITIZEN August 7 DAVID HOE is an AIDS activist and former federal public health adviser. He learned he had HIV in 1988 and almost died in 1996 before he was pulled from the brink by the arrival of new antiviral drugs. He recently celebrated his 70th birthday and is among the growing number of HIV survivors who are living well into their retirement years. David Hoe calls it “the Lazarus thing.” In 1996, he wa

The glamour and money of HIV activism

published: April, 14, 2014 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, Revolving Door, Living with HIV, Guest Authors, Opinion Pieces

Long term survivor Steve from BeyondPositive: “A number of people seem to think there’s a certain amount of glamour and money that comes with being an HIV activist or advocate, but what’s the reality?"

The glamour and money of HIV activism

This article first appeared on BeyondPositive here.   If I might quote from a recent post by our editor, Tom Hayes, on Facebook: “I’ve seen some snarky tweets/statuses alluding that HIV activists/advocates (like myself) only do the work we do for the “glamour and money”. Most months I don’t make enough money to feed myself. And I don’t find anything remotely glamorous about staying in budget hotels (that I often have to pay for myself) and talking about side effects like diarr

AIDS funding: all these new start-up projects make me want to scream!

published: April, 30, 2014 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Opinion Pieces

A guest author says “We end up in the AIDS industry with all of these competing, duplicating services, with very few of them being able to make an impact in any one area to reduce and eradicate the transmission of HIV.”

AIDS funding: all these new start-up projects make me want to scream!

When I see or hear of a new HIV project starting up it makes me want to scream and here is why.  There are so many existing projects and organizations, both small and on a larger scale, in existence today, I cannot keep track of them all. Many of the existing community projects and organizations are not doing anything that is terribly original but rather duplicating one another. In duplicating services the existing programs compete for funds. They compete for funds that are always limited to

The Legacy Project

published: January, 07, 2013 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Activism, General Health, Health, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Treatment, Living with HIV

Building Support through a Mentoring Network: Committee for Accessible AIDS Treatment (CAAT)’s Legacy Project Connects PHAs to Build Capacity and Community

The Legacy Project

This article first appeared on the CATIE website here. Une version française est disponible ici.  Many AIDS service organizations (ASOs) in Canada are committed to the greater and more meaningful involvement of people living with HIV (GIPA and MIPA) and the empowerment of people living with HIV. One manifestation of this commitment is the proliferation of “capacity building” and “leadership” programs for people living with HIV. While such programs play a critical role in building

In conversation with CPPN/RCPS vice-chair, Ottawa’s Gord Asmus

published: April, 18, 2016 Categories // Activism, Features and Interviews, Living with HIV

Philip Dawson is showcasing members of the board of Canada's new national organization for people living with HIV, CPPN/RCPS. Here he talks to vice-chair Gord Asmus

In conversation with CPPN/RCPS vice-chair, Ottawa’s Gord Asmus

"The Canadian Positive People Network (CPPN) / Reseau Canadien Des Personnes Seropositives (RCPS) is a new independent network for and by people living with HIV and HIV co-infections in Canada. We exist as a people’s network to represent the needs of all persons and communities affected by HIV and HIV co-infections. We help ensure the movement is coordinated nationally, provincially, regionally and locally to benefit the affected people and communities, and that we are connected with the glo

HIV and AIDS activism in Africa

published: February, 22, 2018 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, As Prevention , Current Affairs, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, International , Revolving Door, Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

From Posterity Media, Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan and Morolake Odetoyinbo report on two inspiring case studies in HIV activism.

HIV and AIDS activism in Africa

 A Treatment Action Campaign protest  At the just-concluded 2018 Partners Forum that held from February 13 -15, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza, Johannesburg, South Africa, participants were taken through an Advocacy 001 class. The lecture sounded very much like what advocacy should be – planned, with timelines and targets, adequately funded with measureable targets. Sadly, the history of HIV and AIDS activism in Africa was not such structured campaigns. HIV and AIDS activism evolved out of a d

Whats in a haircut? (Stigma that's what.)

published: June, 09, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, Hep B and C, Living with HIV

Guest Author Rob Newman on dealing with everyday stigma and prejudice. Sometimes it's one cut too many.

Whats in a haircut? (Stigma that's what.)

,Had to get my haircut today … I would like to say that my hair was unmanageable and completely out of control but truth be told when my hair gets past a certain length, I just look unkempt. As always I get my haircut at a local joint that doesn’t charge a lot … let’s face it I don’t have a lot of hair. During the cut as in almost every case the small talk will turn to where do you work, what do you do? This question is always a double-edged sword in that when I do tell an otherwise

A cure for AIDS: The HIV advocates turning hope into action

published: July, 04, 2013 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // Activism, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Mark S. King

Mark S. King features the voices of those HIV advocates, many of whom are “cautiously optimistic” that a cure is not too far down the road.

A cure for AIDS: The HIV advocates turning hope into action

My first “AIDS job” in 1987 was at the first AIDS organization in Los Angeles, LA Shanti, and we provided emotional support to clients with AIDS who were usually in their last weeks of life. The intimacy our trained volunteers experienced with the dying, helping them find some inner peace as they left us, is worthy of its own blog posting sometime. Let’s just say it was intense.  We hoped for a cure early on, and then our hope faded. Before long, we didn’t dare hope any longer. We ju

No shame, part two – what changed?

published: March, 05, 2013 Written by // Wayne Bristow - Positive Life Categories // Activism, Gay Men, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific , Wayne Bristow

Wayne Bristow in a follow-up to his recent post about coming out to the world.

 No shame, part two – what changed?

So it's been a couple of weeks since I posted my last blog "No Shame For Being HIV+",  I thought I would write a follow up to share the reaction I received from it. To be honest, it took a large shot of courage to send that article off to be posted. I didn't know how it would affect the people around me. Would I offend someone, would they feel pressed to say something? I believe it could have been a really ugly situation……..if certain people chimed in on it.  My story went up on

The HIV Equal Campaign: having a place at the table

published: April, 16, 2014 Categories // Community Events, Activism, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

Gary Nelson says “seeing ourselves as equal, regardless of our HIV status, is the core belief of the HIV Equal Campaign.”

After a heated exchange between a father and his son in the 1967 classic movie, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, Dr. John Prentice [Sidney Poiter] tells his father [Roy Glenn] that the biggest obstacle that lies between them is how they see themselves. “But Dad, you see yourself as a colored man.  I see myself as a man.” The film was made just a few years after Civil Rights legislation and underscored that timeless axiom that we are all equal. Whether we are black, brown, white, pink, we a

Ed Wolf's journal of the Trump years for September: seventy-seven days after the election.

published: September, 05, 2017 Written by // Ed Wolf Categories // Activism, Current Affairs, International , Ed Wolf

Ed Wolf: "What we feared coming is here, but another part of the story has been revealed as well; we have new eyes."

Ed Wolf's journal of the Trump years for September: seventy-seven days after the election.

Day 74. Preparing for Resistance March 1. Orthotics for heel pain 2. Ibuprofen for knee pain 3. Feminist tee shirt (lots to choose from) 4. Sign covered in plastic to use as umbrella 5. Pink hat that is actually orange but the best I could do in a pinch 6. Review of bathrooms along march route: San Francisco Public Library, BART stations, food court in Westfield Centre, Palace Hotel, MacDonald’s at 2nd and Market, Hyatt Regency, countless Starbucks and, last resort, alley on Jessie St

Reflections for AIDS Awareness Week 2013

published: November, 25, 2013 Categories // Activism, Current Affairs, Events, Health, Sexual Health, Opinion Pieces

Olivia Kijewski : “While I know we have come a long way since AIDS first made its mark on the map in the early 80’s, I find myself spending the most amount of time still considering what needs to done.”

As many of you are well aware, AIDS Awareness week (AAW) is fast approaching. For those of you who don’t know, AIDS Awareness Week is celebrated each year in the lead up to World AIDS Day, December 1st. During this time, we commemorate those we have lost, recognize the resilience of those living with HIV, appreciate what we have achieved, and consider what work still needs to be done globally, nationally, and locally. As we gear up for AAW, I get a lot of opportunity to reflect on the past,

Remembering the AIDS Ribbon

published: November, 21, 2013 Categories // Activism, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

B.C.’s Robert Birch with an open letter to his rural community

Remembering the AIDS Ribbon

Dear neighbors, Soon it will be World AIDS Day again. December 1st, 2013 marks thirty-two years of this global pandemic. This letter is an invitation to you, our community of ten thousand people living here on Salt Spring Island, the largest gulf island on the west coast of Canada, to learn more about this ongoing global pandemic. This letter is a thank you on behalf of our little HIV organization for the many years of support you have given us.  Over these past decades many extraordinary a

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