Articles tagged with: working in an ASO

Need more care for ASO staffers with mental health issues

published: February, 02, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Mental Health, Features and Interviews, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy talks to Toronto’s Ed Argo about the mental health issues that plagued him while working in AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) and why he feels more needs to be done for those in similar situations.

Need more care for ASO staffers with mental health issues

Bob Leahy: Hi Ed. Why don’t I start by asking you why you contacted me? Ed Argo: Many reasons. I’m a person that has lived and lives with mental health issues such as chronic depression, acute anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder and I’ve been thinking about how this connects with GIPA (greater involvement of people living with HIV) and people living with HIV working in AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs). I’m a great believer in Ontario’s Positive Development Leadership Institu

Being an ally

published: February, 04, 2014 Categories // Women, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Megan dePutter is an ally, an HIV-negative woman working in an AIDS Service Organization. But how can allies best function when they have the tools and the capacity for support but not the lived experience of a disease. Megan has the answers.

Being an ally

Ally is a title we often give ourselves. Actually, as an HIV- woman working in the field, it is often a title I give myself. But recently something changed the way I view this word. After a problematic (read: offensive) presentation given by someone who was a positioned as an ally, a colleague of mine later thoughtfully reflected, “ally is not a title we give ourselves; it is a title our community gives to us based on the service we provide to them.” It was an eye-opening moment. As all

“What do you do for a living?”

published: April, 18, 2012 Categories // Women, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

If you work in the AIDS community is it sometimes easier to lie about what you do? Or just be vague? Megan DePutter reports.

“What do you do for a living?”

Enjoying the nice warm weather we had recently, a colleague and I headed out for an evening beer on a patio.  My colleague informed me that tonight she and her husband would be meeting their new neighbours. “What are you going to tell them you do for a living?” I asked. It’s THE question to ask when you’re meeting someone new.  It is a difficult question for a lot of people to answer. When I was growing up, my father was an independent agricultural market analyst & strategist. T

Living in two worlds

Megan DePutter reflects on the challenges of working within the HIV movement and how that impacts on her personal life

Living in two worlds

I spend most of my time living in a world where it’s normal to be gay, it’s normal to be living with HIV, it’s normal to talk openly about sex, and certain political, social and philosophical beliefs are taken for granted. This world encompasses my work life, and is shared with my friends and colleagues who also live in this world. But when I step out of this world, go to parties, go to bars, and engage in the standard “so what do you do for a living” chatter, I’m reminded very qui