Articles tagged with: criminalization of HIV non disclosure

When will justice department announce new approach to prosecuting cases of HIV non-disclosure?

published: July, 17, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Current Affairs, Women, Legal, Media, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Critics say that recent conviction of Indigenous woman is further proof that the use of sexual assault laws in cases of HIV non-disclosure continue to criminalize marginalized people and women of colour

When will justice department announce new approach to prosecuting cases of HIV non-disclosure?

Tanja-Tiziana This article by Alex McClelland previously appeared in NOW Magazine, here. An Indigenous woman with HIV has had her appeal on an aggravated sexual assault conviction dismissed by the Manitoba Court of Appeal. The decision handed down on June 29 comes as a blow to the growing movement of lawyers and human rights advocates pushing to change laws that they say criminalize people with HIV, in particular vulnerable women.  Activists have been calling for a moratorium on all n

“I would not have consented to sex had I known of their HIV status.” This statement is problematic and here’s why.

published: July, 05, 2017 Written by // Samantha Categories // Social Media, Conferences, Current Affairs, Mental Health, Women, Legal, Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific , Samantha

"How can the general public insist upon disclosure when they set the tone and grounds for unsuccessful disclosure?" Samantha offers her takeaway from " Rethinking Justice: the 7th Symposium on HIV Law and Human Rights."

 “I would not have consented to sex had I known of their HIV status.” This statement is problematic and here’s why.

On June 15, 2017 the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network held a symposium in Toronto, Ontario, Rethinking Justice: the 7th Symposium on HIV Law and Human Rights. The symposium focused on unjust HIV criminal legislation in Canada. Canada unfortunately has one of the worst records in the world for the overly broad use of criminal laws to address HIV nondisclosure. Panels of experts and those with lived experience of HIV criminalization presented their research and experiences. The legal experts di

Criminalization of HIV non-disclosure: is the tide turning?

published: June, 19, 2017 Written by // Rob Olver - Editor Categories // Social Media, Conferences, Activism, Current Affairs, Features and Interviews, International , Legal, Media, Rob Olver - Editor

Rob Olver interviews Edwin J. Bernard, Global Co-ordinator of the HIV Justice Network at "Rethinking Justice 2017 Symposium on HIV, Law and Human Rights

Criminalization of HIV non-disclosure: is the tide turning?

One of the things that made the “Rethinking Justice: 2017 Symposium on HIV, Law and Human Rights” a “must-attend” for me was the presence of Edwin J. Bernard, Global Co-ordinator of the HIV Justice Network and foremost expert on HIV criminalization worldwide. PositiveLite.com had interviewed Edwin before and published him as well, but that was all the way back in 2012 and 2016 so I attended the symposium hoping for the chance of an interview. I wasn’t disappointed. Edwin proved very

The intersection between clinic law and health: responding to issues faced by people with HIV

published: June, 16, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Women, Legal, Media, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

HALCO's Ryan Peck:"The fact is that rights, especially for marginalized communities, are constantly under attack."

The intersection between clinic law and health: responding to issues faced by people with HIV

Note: This speech was presented by Ryan Peck, Executive Director of the HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario (HALCO) upon accepting the Legal Aid Ontario 2016 Sidney B. Linden Award. Before focusing on what we at HALCO humbly refer to as holistic and revolutionary (or at least incremental reformist) lawyering, as well as on legal injustices facing people with HIV, I pay tribute to the countless who are no longer with us. HALCO was founded in a dark time. Death was an everyday experience and p

U=U and the overly-broad criminalization of HIV nondisclosure

published: June, 13, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Activism, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Youth, Current Affairs, Women, Health, Legal, Treatment, Media, Opinion Pieces, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

From CATIE Blog, Nicholas Caivano and Sandra Ka Hon Chu give their take on the legal ramifications of Undetectable = Untransmittable (U = U).

U=U and the overly-broad criminalization of HIV nondisclosure

People living with HIV in Canada have been charged with some of the most serious offences in the Criminal Code, even in cases of consensual sex where there was negligible or no risk of HIV transmission, no actual transmission and no intent to transmit. The Undetectable=Untransmittable (“U=U”) campaign is based on scientific research, including the ground-breaking PARTNER study, establishing that when a person living with HIV on treatment maintains an undetectable viral load for at least

Conference Report: CAHR serves lots of good science in Montreal with an extra helping of activism and a side of U=U (undetectable equals untransmittable)

published: April, 12, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Conferences, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy attends CAHR2017 and returns with the highlights (and low points) of four days in Montreal last week

Conference Report: CAHR serves lots of good science in Montreal with an extra helping of activism and a side of U=U (undetectable equals untransmittable)

With a motto “We’re not done yet” the 26th Annual Canadian conference on HIV/AIDS Research - CAHR 2017 – slid into a very wet and windy Montreal last week.  It was a good conference, more interesting and engaging and approachable than many – but ultimately what impressed just as much came not from the conference program itself but from the actions of the community present. First a word about how and why I was able to attend. It’s a privilege to earn a community scholarship that

At AIDS2016: HIV criminalization takes the world stage

published: August, 11, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Social Media, Conferences, African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, Gay Men, Current Affairs, International , Legal, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Health Minister Philpott demands “all Canadians share the blame” for exacerbating the HIV epidemic through HIV criminalization. The Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network reports from AIDS2016:

At AIDS2016: HIV criminalization takes the world stage

A message from the Canadian HIV AIDS Legal Network: The international movement against HIV criminalization is growing, with renewed calls for action and advocacy — most recently at the 2016 International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. During a week of discussions, attendees regularly underscored the importance of intersectionality in the global efforts to end the punitive and abusive laws that harm people living with HIV and other marginalized communities, including racialized p

Women living with HIV and intimate partner violence: Questions & Answers

published: July, 21, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Women, Legal, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

A new guide produced by HIV/AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario (HALCO), the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, METRAC and the AIDS Committee of Toronto.

Women living with HIV and intimate partner violence: Questions & Answers

Abuse by an intimate partner is not only wrong - it can be against the law. Yet, intimate partner violence is one of the most common forms of violence against women. Intimate partner violence can be physical, emotional, psychological or sexual abuse from someone with whom you have or had an intimate relationship. This guide is for women, including trans women, who are living with HIV and who experience or are at risk of experiencing violence from their intimate partner.  This guide pro

After Alabama – a second perspective on HIV is not a Crime

published: June, 01, 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Activism, Conferences, International , Legal, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Guest writer Gail Mahood was also in Huntsville, Alabama for the HIV is not a Crime Training Academy. Here are her reflections of what she learned about “layers of oppression and policing sexuality”.

After Alabama – a second perspective on HIV is not a Crime

I left the conference in Alabama as a white, privileged woman feeling hopeful and excited about changes we are going to make concerning HIV criminalization. My hope was inspired from people of colour in the Deep South, a community which is impacted by HIV disproportionately; a community which has lived with racism, mass incarceration, and in a policed state where HIV is viewed as another crime for which oppressed people must be brought to justice. In short, another layer of oppression.  

After Alabama… just one perspective

published: May, 30, 2016 Written by // Jeff Potts Categories // Activism, Conferences, Current Affairs, Events, International , Legal, Jeff Potts, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Jeff Potts reports back on the "HIV is not a crime" training academy for those advocating against criminalization of HIV non-disclosure

After Alabama… just one perspective

Once a trusted advisor to the President of the United States, Army Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Pinkela was convicted of an alleged aggravated assault for HIV exposure in 2012, and he spent 272 days in a military prison. Kerry Thomas is living with HIV and an undetectable viral load. Even though he used condoms, and despite the fact that he never transmitted HIV, Kerry was convicted for non-disclosure of his HIV-positive status and was sentenced to 30 years in the Idaho State Correctional Cent

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