Articles tagged with: antiretroviral therapy (ART)

Starting ART immediately after HIV diagnosis cuts mortality risk by two-thirds for people with high CD4 cell counts

published: November, 08, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

Over 12 months of follow-up, individuals who started antiretrovirals within 30 days of their diagnosis had a 63% reduction in their mortality risk compared to people who remained antiretroviral-naïve. From AIDSmap, Michael Carrter reports.

Starting ART immediately after HIV diagnosis cuts mortality risk by two-thirds for people with high CD4 cell counts

People with a high CD4 cell count who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately after diagnosis with HIV cut their 12-month mortality risk by two-thirds, according to research conducted in China and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The retrospective study involved over 35,000 people who were newly diagnosed with HIV between 2012 and 2014. All had a CD4 cell count above 500 cells/mm3. Over 12 months of follow-up, individuals who started antiretrovirals within 30 days of their d

Investigating where patients go when they leave HIV care

published: November, 06, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , CATIE, General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Research, Sexual Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media

From CATIE, Sean R. Hosein reports on research that begins to paint a picture of what happens when people living with HIV are "lost to follow-up."

Investigating where patients go when they leave HIV care

- Previous research has found HIV-positive Canadians stop attending follow-up HIV appointments at rates between 11% and 24%. - Alberta researchers find that many patients “lost to follow-up” are seeking healthcare outside HIV services, often in hospital emergency rooms. - This research has implications for programs that seek to re-engage patients in HIV care. Potent combination anti-HIV therapy (ART) can reduce levels of HIV in the blood (viral load) to very low levels that cannot be de

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

published: October, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, International AIDS Conference , As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Living with HIV, Media

Nearly 40% with an undetectable viral load still consider themselves infectious. Gus Cairns reports on a European study commissioned by Gilead Sciences.

People with HIV still expect a lower quality of life than their negative peers, European survey finds

A study commissioned by the drug company Gilead Sciences and conducted in five European countries has found that, compared with their HIV-negative peers, people with HIV still expect to die sooner and think they are less likely to achieve a long-term relationship. The results were announced yesterday during the 16th European AIDS Conference (EACS 2017) in Milan, Italy. The survey found that 54% of HIV-positive people considered HIV to be a barrier to sex with others, and of them 87% (47% o

80 days of HIV

published: October, 05, 2017 Written by // Alex Sparrowhawk Categories // Activism, Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces, Alex Sparrowhawk

Alex Sparrowhawk checks in and talks about his new project, "...to show a daily snapshot of life with the virus."

80 days of HIV

I’ve not written anything for a while, or more accurately I have written a lot and left the contents of my ramblings in the draft vaults of WordPress.com. So what’s going on in my life? Well I’ve been dating someone since May and it’s going well enough for us to venture on our first trip away this weekend. Work is good and over the summer I was so proud to see our Can’t Pass It On campaign launch as well as tick off a number of other projects I’ve been working on this year. M

New US PrEP cost-effectiveness model finds drug prices will need to drop substantially if HIV risk rises, or if adherence is only moderate

published: September, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

"With high adherence, PrEP saves money in high-prevalence populations even at current costs." From AIDSmap, Gus Cairns reports.

New US PrEP cost-effectiveness model finds drug prices will need to drop substantially if HIV risk rises, or if adherence is only moderate

A new US model of the cost-effectiveness of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM), prepared by researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, finds that taking even one year of PrEP is more cost-effective than measures like kidney dialysis, if it is used by people belonging to populations where HIV prevalence is at least 10%. However, for PrEP to actually save money, relative to the lifetime cost of treating the HIV infections that would otherwise happen, either

Incidence of anal cancer has already peaked among HIV-positive gay men; reductions can be achieved with expanded ART coverage and screening

published: August, 17, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, General Health, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors, Media

From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports on the first study to predict the incidence of anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM long term, taking into account cART [combination antiretroviral therapy] coverage and individual CD4 cell trajectories.

Incidence of anal cancer has already peaked among HIV-positive gay men; reductions can be achieved with expanded ART coverage and screening

The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-positive gay men peaked in 2009 and will decline substantially by 2030, even with current levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage and no cancer-screening programme, Swiss investigators report in AIDS. Further significant reductions would be achieved with 100% treatment coverage and various screening strategies. These would be more effective at preventing cases of anal populationcancer than screening for cervical cancer among women in the gener

Why are so many young women still dying of HIV/AIDS?

published: July, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

Kanan Shah and Dr. Kristina Talbert-Slagle of Yale University present research on the barriers to testing, treatment, regimen adherence and health experienced by women in disparate world settings

Why are so many young women still dying of HIV/AIDS?

Sophia is a 24-year-old mother living in Texas. Like many low-income women in Texas, Sophia receives general medical care at a family planning site, where she was diagnosed with HIVi. Placed on antiretroviral therapy (ART) Sophia, like one in five Texans, is uninsuredii making her treatment virtually unaffordable. Texas is one of nearly 20 states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Actiii, leaving millions without affordable health insurance. Texas also has

Viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting ART is associated with a significant ten-year mortality risk

published: July, 12, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Media

“Low-level viral loads between 400 and 999 copies/ml shortly after starting ART appear to place patients at a significantly higher 10-year risk of death than patients with viral loads under 20 copies/ml..." From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting ART is associated with a significant ten-year mortality risk

A viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting HIV therapy is associated with a substantial ten-year mortality risk, investigators from the United States report in the online edition of AIDS. People with a viral load between 400 and 999 copies/ml had a 20% mortality risk, similar to the 23% risk observed in people with a viral load between 1000 and 4 million copies/ml. In contrast, the mortality risk was only 14% for individuals who rapidly achieved complete viral suppressio

Zambian activists launch ‘Team No Shame About HIV+’ campaign

published: July, 11, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Social Media, Activism, Current Affairs, Mental Health, Health, Revolving Door, International , Guest Authors, Living with HIV, Media

Activists adapt Kevin Maloney's "No Shame About Being HIV+" campaign to raise HIV awareness in Zambia. From The Zambian Analyst, Paul Shalala reports

Zambian activists launch ‘Team No Shame About HIV+’ campaign

Some of the activists who are part of the campaign   -Photos by Rise Up To HIV Over a dozen Zambian youths living with HIV and those who are passionate about fighting the spread of the virus have taken to social media to launch a campaign dubbed ‘Team No Shame About HIV+.’ The youths aim to raise awareness about their HIV status and inspire others to come out in the open and live positive lives. In a country where being HIV positive is sometimes associated with bad behaviour, these ac

We must listen to science not stigma

published: July, 06, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Lifestyle, Media

Around 1 in 3 Brits would be ‘uncomfortable’ giving First Aid to someone with HIV on effective treatment, according to Terrence Higgins Trust survey, while nearly 40% would be ‘uncomfortable’ going on a date.

We must listen to science not stigma

Medical evidence has shown that people living with HIV and who are on effective treatment cannot pass on the virus. However, a major new survey by Terrence Higgins Trust has shown that only 9% of the British public are aware of this fact, which has been evidenced by scientific research. Meanwhile around one in three (32%) adults would feel uncomfortable giving first aid to someone living with HIV who is on effective treatment, according to the YouGov survey of 2,022 adults. And nearly 40% o

[12 3 4 5  >>