Articles tagged with: aidsmap_com

Gay men using HIV self-tests promptly seek confirmatory testing and linkage to care, New York data suggests

published: July, 24, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, General Health, Sexual Health, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Are people who self-test for HIV less likely to engage with the support and treatment services they need? From AIDSmap, Roger Pebody reports on a US study that suggests not.

Gay men using HIV self-tests promptly seek confirmatory testing and linkage to care, New York data suggests

Data from the partner services programme in New York City suggests that gay men who have previously used an HIV self-test tend to seek confirmatory testing without delay, according to an article published online ahead of print in Sexually Transmitted Diseases. The study also highlights socio-demographic differences between those using self-tests and other people with new HIV diagnoses, suggesting that the price of the kit discourages its use by those with lower incomes. One of the mai

Viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting ART is associated with a significant ten-year mortality risk

published: July, 12, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

“Low-level viral loads between 400 and 999 copies/ml shortly after starting ART appear to place patients at a significantly higher 10-year risk of death than patients with viral loads under 20 copies/ml..." From AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting ART is associated with a significant ten-year mortality risk

A viral load as low as 400 copies/ml six months after starting HIV therapy is associated with a substantial ten-year mortality risk, investigators from the United States report in the online edition of AIDS. People with a viral load between 400 and 999 copies/ml had a 20% mortality risk, similar to the 23% risk observed in people with a viral load between 1000 and 4 million copies/ml. In contrast, the mortality risk was only 14% for individuals who rapidly achieved complete viral suppressio

Canadian Minister of Health opens International Harm Reduction Conference amid controversy over overdose deaths

published: June, 01, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, Conferences, Events, Health, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Last year an estimated 2300 people died of heroin and fentanyl-related overdoses in Canada. It looks likely that this figure will increase in 2017. From AIDSmap, Susie McLean reports onThe 25th International Harm Reduction Conference (HR17) in Montréal.

Canadian Minister of Health opens International Harm Reduction Conference amid controversy over overdose deaths

Health Minister Jane Philpott and protestors at the HR17 opening ceremony © Charles Mackay / HRI The 25th International Harm Reduction Conference (HR17) in Montréal, Canada, kicked off with a dramatic opening session last week, featuring Jane Philpott, Canadian Minister of Health, along with a group of angry protesters chanting ‘They talk, we die’.    The minister’s speech and the protest focused on the soaring rate of overdose deaths dominating the work of harm reduction organis

Many physicians are wary of providing HIV PrEP for young people

published: May, 31, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Youth, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Health, International , Treatment, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Liz Highleyman reports: "While 42% of the physicians overall said they were highly or somewhat likely to recommend PrEP, only 34% said they were likely to actually prescribe it."

Many physicians are wary of providing HIV PrEP for young people

Tanya Mullins at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting. Photo by Liz Highleyman, hivandhepatitis.com Only about a third of family practice and paediatric providers said they would be likely to prescribe HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to adolescent patients, underlining the need to educate providers outside the HIV and sexually transmitted disease fields, according to a report at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting last week in San Francisco. Tanya Mullins of Cincinnati Chil

HIV’s milder cousin may be less mild than previously thought

published: March, 29, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Social Media, Conferences, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Gus Cairns: Seventy per cent of people with HIV-2 progress to AIDS within 20 years

HIV’s milder cousin may be less mild than previously thought

HIV-2’s virulence may have been underestimated and although progression to AIDS  and death in HIV-2 infection was slower than with HIV-1, it was the rule rather than the exception, new research from West Africa presented at last month's Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) indicates. HIV-2 crossed over into human beings from the sooty mangabey monkey, rather than from chimpanzees and gorillas like HIV-1. Its entry into humans probably precedes that of HIV

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

published: March, 22, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Social Media, Conferences, Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Mental Health, Women, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap, Liz Highleyman reports on several studies looking into the efffects of HIV on brain function.

Studies look at brain and cognitive changes in people with HIV as they age

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains a poorly-understood co-morbidity in HIV-positive people. Wh

STI rates in PrEP users very high, but evidence that PrEP increases them is inconclusive

published: March, 17, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Conferences

AIDSmap.com's Gus Cairns: Modelling study predicts STI rates will fall with regular testing

STI rates in PrEP users very high, but evidence that PrEP increases them is inconclusive

A study of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) users presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) last week in Seattle, showed that PrEP users had very high rates of sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnosis – in the order of 20 times higher than among HIV-negative gay men in the general population. There was also an increase in STI diagnoses from a time point a year before they sought PrEP to the date they started it. And the percentage of men r

One in five ‘heterosexual’ men in the UK caught their HIV from another man.

published: March, 10, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, Research, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From AIDSmap.com, Gus Cairns reports on new data presented by Manon Ragonnet-Cronin and colleagues from Edinburgh University at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week.

One in five ‘heterosexual’ men in the UK caught their HIV from another man.

A genetic analysis of a large database of people with HIV in the UK in care shows that 18% of men with HIV who claim to be exclusively heterosexual in fact belong to clusters of linked infections that consist only of men. This provides a minimum figure for the proportion of men with HIV in the UK who are what the researchers call “undisclosed men who have sex with men (MSM)”. It is a minimum figure because other men who caught HIV through sex with another man may be in mixed-gender cluste

Better depression care could improve outcomes for HIV treatment programmes

published: March, 02, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Mental Health, Research, Health, International , Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

For AIDSmap.com, Roger Pebody reports from the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle.

Better depression care could improve outcomes for HIV treatment programmes

Improved management of depression and other mental health disorders has the potential to improve the outcomes of HIV treatment programmes, Pamela Collins of the National Institute of Mental Health told the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle last week. Mental health treatment should be integrated into HIV services in resource-limited settings, she said. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers, lung disease and other non-communicable diseases ha

Women significantly more likely than men to have suboptimal adherence to HIV therapy

published: February, 27, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Women, Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Canadian research "shows that sex maintains a significant and independent effect on adherence.” For AIDSmap, Michael Carter reports.

Women significantly more likely than men to have suboptimal adherence to HIV therapy

Women are more likely than men to have poor adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), according to Canadian research published in HIV Medicine. Adherence was monitored in a cohort of over 4000 people in British Columbia over 14 years. After controlling for injecting drug use (IDU) and ethnicity, 57% of women and 77% of men attained optimum 95% adherence. “Our findings indicate that women are significantly less likely to achieve optimal adherence to cART than men,” com

[12 3 4 5  >>